What kind of hay for windbreaks???

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by workaholic90, Oct 31, 2013.

  1. workaholic90

    workaholic90 Out Of The Brooder

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    So we have a small Formex coop and it's only October and we already have super high winds (60mph) and wind chills are negative already. So i do no want to use a heat lamp in the coop but was thinking i could block three sides with some squares of hay. My question, are there certain types of hay that i want or don't want? Should i be worried about the girls and the hay? We have sand and rock in the run and sand in the small coop. We do have hardy birds (Easter eggers, Black/red star and B.O.).
    I was thinking to kind of build a house for them too so they can be outside and draft free. I have a desk that I turned into a huddle box but i want to give them as many options as possible. I can get it pretty cheap here in Colorado but just want to make sure i know what i am looking for.....

    Thanks ya'll!!!
     
  2. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    I wouldn't use hay at all as a "windbreak"
    I'd use plastic, or plywood panels, or metal, or almost anything other than bales of hay or straw
     
  3. appps

    appps Overrun With Chickens

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    As long as there is no chance they can blow over and squash someone or get wet when it rains I don't see why not.

    Plain old ordinary straw is probably less likely to get eaten than something like good Lucerne hay.

    You may find though that's its not as economical as just using something like that black plastic weed mat to put up wind breaks. That's what I've used.
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2013
  4. workaholic90

    workaholic90 Out Of The Brooder

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    They would be outside not under a roof so they will get wet!
     
  5. workaholic90

    workaholic90 Out Of The Brooder

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    how do u do that ??? im confused
     
  6. workaholic90

    workaholic90 Out Of The Brooder

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    Also, it's for windbreak but insulation too. If you say no, would you please say why. We get constant 60mph winds over here so it has to be something heavy and durable.
     
  7. yogifink

    yogifink Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Get some heavy gage clear plastic roofing material and fasten to the sides of the coop and run as described by the manufacturer. They will be a bit more costly up front, as compared to straw, but after a year or two of re-use, they will be less expensive the having to buy new straw each year.

    With that High of wind, I would not use black plastic or paper of any kind as it would most likely rip and tare where it is fastened to the coop (that is if you dont use batten boards) - A high quality thick tarp would be a better option if you were to go that route, IMO.
     
  8. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    It's not going to "insulate" anything by sitting outside the coop.
    By the time Spring rolls around, the wet bales will weigh about three times more, and be starting to rot

    If you want "insulation" value, you need to attach something like styrofoam TO the coop with no air gaps in between. That will also block the wind
     
  9. wsmith

    wsmith Chillin' With My Peeps


    Sounds like my place. I put up 6 foot wood fencing, every third post is braced with a 45 degree brace cemented in. Where in Colorado are you? I frequently get 60 + winds as well.

    Come visit the Colorado Thread at: https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/68894/colorado/17450#post_12252531
     
  10. Weasleymum

    Weasleymum Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think straw bales would make a fine windbreak. I'm planning on using them, myself, once our run is finished. Will simply stack a few bales outside the west end of the run, which is covered-- not all the way up, maybe 3' tall. It is as good a place as any to store extra straw, which I'm going to try using as litter in the run. If I don't like how it works as litter, then I'll just use the straw as garden mulch.

    It won't "insulate" the run (which would be impossible, and completely against the entire point of a run, which is that the chickens can be OUTSIDE and in the fresh air!), but it will block some of the prevailing winter wind.
     

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