What other than coccidiosis?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by dreamdoc, Mar 28, 2018.

  1. dreamdoc

    dreamdoc Chirping

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    Mar 12, 2012
    I bought 4 chicks from a local breeder two weeks ago. They are now 6 weeks old and I noticed what looked like pinkish blood in a stool when I was cleaning there cage a few days ago. The were not, and are not, on medicated feed. They have been raised in a brooder inside since their arrival. I noticed yesterday that a stool had fresh blood in it So it's been about 5 days of slowly progressing blood. All chicks are feisty and eating and drinking. Nobody looks sick. In California you must have a vet see and test the chick to get antibiotics (about $100) so i was waiting to see what happened. I also found I could get the antibiotic online so I ordered it and hope it arrives today. I can then treat the flock. I'd like some feedback about what to do. Maybe it's not coccidiosis since its been almost a week and no onne looks or acts sick? I did let them eat some grass from the yard and gave them chick grit. Could she have acquired it from this? Should I go to the vet and just pay the money to save the chick or hold out for the antibiotic to hopefully arrive today or tomorrow? Clearly I am a city girl who struggles with letting nature just play out but $100 is not chump change. HELP!!!
     
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  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    Can you call around to local farm or feed stores for Corid (amprollium) liquid or powder? It is a cattle medicine for treatment of scours in cattle and for coccidiosis in chickens.
    It is not an antibiotic, and is OTC. Dosage is 1.5 tsp of the powder or 2 tsp of the liquid per gallon of water as the only source of water for 5-7 days. Afterward, give some probiotics if your feed does not include them. Make sure they are all drinking well.

    Usually with chicks, I will include a piece of sod every 3 days for them to peck on, so they slowly build up resistance to coccidia in the soil.
     
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  3. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Free Ranging

    I'm in Ca and antibiotics WON't treat cocci.

    Get Corid at the feed store and follow the treatment dose or if you can't figure the dose out... maybe @casportpony can help you. It works by blocking thiamine to starve out and SLOW the growth of coccidia. Do not supplement vitamins during treatment and make sure they have no other source of water. Make sure you change water anytime you see a poo get in it since this is a rapid way to spread it.

    Since cocci is in every single chicken poo, an overgrowth can happen at anytime. This is what causes the blood, which actually only presents in 1 out of the 9-11 strains.

    Not looking sick, sleeping standing up and puffed feathers... means they are fighting it off some. But the blood is a sign of intestinal damage and if gone to far can cause some necrosis tot he tissue which could permanently stunt their growth.

    Also make sure your shaving are dry. Mine were wetter under neath once then they appeared to be on top.

    Good luck! :fl
     
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  4. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General

    Sulfa antibiotics do treat coccidiosis. :)
     
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  5. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    Sulfa antibiotics such as sulfadimethoxine (Albon,) sulfamethazine, and others will treat coccidiosis, but in the US, they are not available without a vet prescription since 2017.
     
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  6. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General

    Go to a feed store and get some Corid, AmproMed, or Amprol. Get the powder or the liquid, it doesn't matter. Since it's not an antibiotic, no prescription is needed. :)

    Powder dose is no less than 1.5 teaspoons per gallon for 5 days, then 1/3 teaspoon per gallon for 7-14 days.

    Liquid dose is 2 teaspoons per gallon for 5 days, then 1/2 teaspoon per gallon for 7-14 days.

    Corid is usually found in the cattle section, so be sure to check there. Ignore directions for cattle because the cattle dose is different than the chicken dose.
     
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  7. dreamdoc

    dreamdoc Chirping

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  8. dreamdoc

    dreamdoc Chirping

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    Sorry, assumed Corid was antibiotic. The feed store told me I could only get it from a vet
     
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  9. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General

    The 40% injectable is still OTC in most states. All drugs in Calfornia now require a prescription as of 1-1-2018. :(
     
  10. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General

    Tractor Supply stocks Corid.
     

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