What sex do you think my pekin bantam babies are?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by kpborkowski, Jan 2, 2014.

  1. kpborkowski

    kpborkowski Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi all my pekin bantam babies are approx 6 weeks old now could you please help me figure out what sex they are. Hope the picture is ok. Also are these what you would call cuckoo? Thanks in advance :D


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  2. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    They're very cute, but I think both male. I wouldn't know about whether or not they're cuckoo though. Best wishes.
     
  3. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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  4. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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  5. kpborkowski

    kpborkowski Out Of The Brooder

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    Oh no I was hoping for at least one pullet :( We live in the suburbs and I know we are allowed one rooster but 2 might be pushing it with the neighbours.

    Does anyone know how noisy pekin bantam roosters are I have no experience of keeping one? Also we have 7 girls all standard size except for 1 pekin girl would this work?

    Ohhh just feel really sad don't want to get rid of them they are just too precious :(
     
  6. CCCCCCCCHICKENS

    CCCCCCCCHICKENS Overrun With Chickens

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    I was told what you call Pekins in Australia, is the same as what we call cochin batams here. I have a mottled cochin bantam cockerel. I heard him crow once and never again. I have many cockerels/rooster around for showing an breeding and he is submissive. So mine is very quiet. But since they would be your only cockerels they may be loud, I am not sure.
    X4.
     
  7. kpborkowski

    kpborkowski Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks cccccccchickens I understand that what you call cochins we call Pekins. Fingers crossed our babies turn out to be quiet so we can keep them :)
     
  8. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote: In my experience the frequency and duration and pitch and so forth of crowing is pretty highly heritable. But it can also be learned. One faraway neighbor's rooster going off all hours of the night can teach a whole lot of males to go off at such hours too. As for whether they are going to be loud or repetitive, the best bet for ascertaining that is usually to see what their father and mother's father crow like. Not much help with your situation, I know. Recent ancestral influence accounts for more than whatever is stated as a given for a breed, in my experience, as each breed has numerous strains and family lines each with their own individual differences.

    Hope they're quiet! Best wishes.
     
  9. kpborkowski

    kpborkowski Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks for your response chicken obsessed - very interesting. I do have the ladies number still who we got the chicks from and I did view the father (very handsome) so I might just ask her how loud he is :)

    I do love the sound of a rooster crowing, but not sure whether the neighbours will...
     
  10. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    lol, good thing you like the crowing! But it can be stressful when the neighbors don't. Some people do, but one tiny bantam rooster is capable of being heard from ten miles away on a clear night sometimes, depending on topography and so forth... So hopefully you are surrounded by neighbors who will find it nostalgic or whatever, and your little fella/s will not be too loud.

    I did manage to partially train some roosters out of crowing, but they still go through the motions, just silently, so I assume this is something of an automatic spasm with them. I've noticed subordinate roos around dominants do silent crows when they just "had to go" lol. They just don't add voice to it. For the sake of not stressing the animals, it's better to not bother trying to train them out of something so automatic. Most of them can't help themselves at all, and some will actually become louder and more frequent, like hysterical, if stressed in any way.

    Might be worth looking into building a rooster box. It works on some, not on others. And it can be a bother always putting them in there. But when you have an otherwise great rooster or a pet or you're just not ready to cull, you've gotta do what you've gotta do, lol.

    I had a rooster whom I ended up culling who learned to crow nonstop all night every night. I would put him in a rooster box and this fella would sometimes put his head under his body to stretch out his neck enough to crow; he didn't always need to stretch out his neck either, unlike many, and could crow laying down. There was just no stopping him. It was a relief to cull him. Needless to say, the rooster he learned the habit from (not one of mine, but a 'present') was culled a lot sooner. I'm not exaggerating at all when I say this one would crow every time he filled his lungs, all night long. He would crow and draw the next breath and crow that one out and draw the next breath and crow that one out.... Maddening! I tried to out-wait him, thinking he would settle down, but he literally kept up a cacophony of unending noise from dusk to dawn every night. Sorry for the horror stories, but better to be wary and prepared rather than suffer sleep deprivation because a rooster turns out to be too vocal and you're unprepared to handle it.

    Best wishes.
     

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