What Should Everyone Have In There Chickens Medicine Cabinet

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Loddie Da, Sep 26, 2010.

  1. Loddie Da

    Loddie Da Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 14, 2007
    Troy, New York
    What should everyone have in there flocks medicine cabinet?
    Both first aid, treatments & supplements.
    How much should you have & what dose it do?
     
  2. Sillystunt

    Sillystunt Master of the Silly

    Jul 11, 2008
    Winter Haven, FL
    vetrx ...............................................respitory, helps with breathing kinda like vicks vapor rub(which is no good for chickens)
    corrid................................................cocci
    sumlet..............................................corynza & other illness
    tylan 50 or tylan for water...............respitory, snotty nose, bubbly eyes(my favorite)
    blue kote .........................................for cuts & bleeding
    Vitamins...........................................week chickens or chicks just born
    fish mox...........................................bumble foot
    fowl pox vacc...................................florida is horrible with it!

    that's what i have in my shed. Doses change depending on size & how many birds you need to do.
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2010
  3. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Feb 5, 2009
    South Georgia
    #2 and 3 are spelled Corid and Sulmet.

    I don't keep anything. Do wish I'd had some Blukote once in a while, though. Hopefully you will not need the others.

    If you put them on a worming program, you will want to research what to use and buy the drugs fresh. Same with antibiotics like Tylan; I've never bought any and have had chickens off and on for years.

    Fowl pox is rampant here, too. For the most part, it makes black flat marks on their combs which go away after 3 weeks, then they are immune.

    You probably keep a generic Neosporin for yourself. This can be used on the chickens for minor wounds. You might use a little on fowl pox lesions is they are extensive and start looking infected.
     
  4. joebryant

    joebryant Overrun With Chickens

    CHICKENS - MEDICINE CABINET SUPPLIES

    The following members posted the following information:

    Riocotesei
    Sulmet-- treament for Coccidiosis, Infectious Coryza, Acute Fowl Cholora, and Pullorum Disease. Can be found in feedstores. I had a hard time finding it, however.

    Mrs. AK-Bird-Brain
    Terramycin (General Antibiotic)
    Tylan 50 or 200 (Antibiotic)
    Amprolium (cocci)
    Sulmet (cocci, & respiratory, I believe)
    Q-tips
    Gauze and tape (sports-tape works really well)
    non pain-relief Neosporin or A&D Ointment
    Peroxide
    Iodine or Betadine (antiseptic)
    Stiptic pencil or some other blood stauncher (I always seem to get one toe that bleeds when I trim... )
    Wazine or other wormer
    Tweezers, fine needle, fine cotton thread
    BlueKote (antiseptic, anti-pick)

    hinkjc
    Poly-vi-sol infant vitamins
    Vitamins and Electrolytes (Durvet)
    Copper Sulfate
    Nail clipper
    Displosable gloves
    Vet RX
    Oxine

    BJ
    Pine tar - for feather picking/wounds. CHICKEN little 1 (comment about BJ’s pine tar) - It does work well.It healed a rather large wound (from being pecked),and she's starting to grow feathers again.

    ChooksinIowa
    Blue-Kote - it is an antibacterial/antifungal for wounds.
    VetRx - it is for respiratory problems.
    Rooster Booster brand anti-pick formula
    Xenodine for wounds
    Permethrin dust - lice and mite dust
    Poly-vi-sol - vitamins for chicks who may not be doing too well initially



    Tuffoldhen
    SEE URL : http://backyardchickens.yuku.com/topic/ … e-Box.html – for a very long, excellent list of medications and treatments that everyone should have on hand for emergencies.

    ChickaD
    Cayenne pepper, can be mixed with garlic powder, an antibiotic. The cayenne pepper stops bleeding from a wound and helps prevent shock. (fox attack)

    patandchickens (URL’s)
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/v … php?id=454
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/v … p?id=10769
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/v … hp?id=6446
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/v … hp?id=3054

    chickn
    Ground raw hulled Pumpkin Seeds are a good natural wormer.
    Apple Cider Vinegar at a rate of 1 tablespoon per gallon of water (daily) is a natural remedy to help ward of worms.
    In the coop I have a box of paper towels and a bottle of hand sanitizer.

    lilchick
    Vics Vapor Rub it stops the picking cause it tastes so bad....

    Baby wipes for you and the birds...

    Baby oil to use on leg mites...

    Pet toe nail clippers.. for nails, spurs and trimming beaks too...

    Sissors to trim wings and those dirty "butt" feathers...

    Extra syringes and needles for injectable meds.....

    Ivermectin.... can use horse wormer it is cheaper and easier to get than liquid... great for tapeworms that regular wormers can't kill....
     
  5. jaimslee4u

    jaimslee4u Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 11, 2009
    Maine
    Quote:[​IMG] - I think you got it!!!!!!! I deff second the Betadine (use it all the time), Peroxide, & Neosporin. Also vet wrap is a good one to have on hand oh & A&D ointment is a good one in the winter.
     
  6. NYREDS

    NYREDS Overrun With Chickens

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    Jan 14, 2008
    Louse powder, a Coccidiostat & a hatchet.
     
  7. Loddie Da

    Loddie Da Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 14, 2007
    Troy, New York
    Thanks guys...

    I just didn't want to miss anything [​IMG]

    I also try to keep:

    IV kit
    IV pain killer (don't recall the name)
    Bulb syringe
    Disposable tourniquets
    Tweezers
    Tick remover
    Sugar (I have found nothing works better then sugar water to perk up chicks on death's door)
    Feeding tube
    Cold packs
    Heating packs
    Battery operated heating pad or blanket (works grate for saving embryos in a power outage)
    Scalpel
    Sevin dust
    Super glue
    Elizabethan collar (you put it on backwards, cone part down on birds)
    Cable ties
    Bird hand feeding formula
    Kelp powder (I swear by the stuff...)
    Small cage
    Stethoscope
    Dental pick (cleans out nose blockages better then anything else I'v tried)
    Pedialyte
    Cat harness & leash (for birds that can't stand but want to, tie it so they can't laid down 3 times for 15 mins. each a day to help rebuild leg strangth)
    Laser thermometer
    Normal thermometer
     
  8. mauigirl

    mauigirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 14, 2010
    Maui Hawaii
    Researched sulmet and corid found this sight http://fowlfacts.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=medshhh&action=display&thread=152
    specifcally
    "Severe infections of coccidiosis will result in young chickens being sleepy and sitting with ruffled feathers. In cases of cecal coccidiosis, dropping will contain blood. Heavy mortality can result if treatment is not started immediately.

    Treatment consists of drugs such as liquid amprolium or sulfa drugs (Sulmet, ESB3 or Whitsyn), but one should be careful with sulfa drugs, as they can be toxic when given too long or in too high dosages.

    Never give sulfa drugs to laying hens. In E. Necatrix infectious blood may occur in the intestine and mortality can be 1% per week or more.
    E. Acervulina infections are less dramatic, but tend to be more chronic in nature with long term damage to the intestine and resulting in smaller, unthrifty pullets that do not produce enough eggs.

    If chickens appear sick and ruffled from coccidiosis, get a diagnosis at a diagnostic laboratory. It can be made quickly and medication started immediately.


    Amprolium (Corid) - for treating coccidiosis; very safe. (See recommended dose under coccidiosis).

    Sulfaquinoxaline or Sulfamethazine - water or feed; less safe; somewhat toxic to bone marrow. Withdrawal - 10 days."
     

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