What Should I Do To Make My Hatches Successful?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by teisenhand, Jan 4, 2013.

  1. teisenhand

    teisenhand Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 8, 2012
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    I Have a hovabator 1602N with an egg turner. I have gone trhough 3 batches of eggs, and have gotten no chicks! in each batch, atleast 3-4 of the eggs would make it to the last 3 days but then they would never hatch? I really dont want to buy another incubator because i dont want to spend more money. But should i buy a special thermometer to make sure the temp is set right? What about a fan? Would that help? Please help! Thanks!
     
  2. TheSpeckledRoo

    TheSpeckledRoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It almost seems to me the humidity is off... Do you have a humidity control? or can you test for humidity?
     
  3. teisenhand

    teisenhand Out Of The Brooder

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    I can fill up the water trays o make the humidity increase, and I have a digital hygrometer (but I thinks its off). i have been told thats the problem by a lot of people, what do you recommend the humidity to be during the first 18 days of incubation and for the last 3 days of incubation?
     
  4. TheSpeckledRoo

    TheSpeckledRoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I usually do 40% on days 1-18 and 70% from 19- to the end
     
  5. Holleran Farms

    Holleran Farms Out Of The Brooder

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    I have a big incubator and have had the best hatch using the dry method. The dry method is zero water and then adding water to up the humidity the last three days. Not sure if this will work in a small incubator but may be worth trying. -Holleran Farms.
     
  6. Sally Sunshine

    Sally Sunshine Cattywampus Angel <straightens Halo> Premium Member Project Manager

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  7. LukensFarms

    LukensFarms Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We have all experienced this. With the small incubators one of the biggest things people forget is the outside temperature around the incubator. They can't sometimes get the heat caught up in time like they need. What I mean is if you don't have a forced air furnace or something of that nature where the incubator is in the temperature only fluctuates about 5° you likely could be having a problem. I would recommend insulating around the incubator and or making sure I have a very stable environment where my incubator is.
     
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  8. iamcuriositycat

    iamcuriositycat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It will help a lot to try to understand what went wrong in your previous hatches, so you can correct.

    I absolutely agree that extra insulation and carefully monitored temp is the most important thing you can do. If you're losing babies along the way--versus losing them all early, or all late, etc.--then temp is a very likely culprit. Some babies can withstand wider temp variations than others, and some are just situated more optimally in the incubator. Some will die from complications resulting from lower temps, and therefore the deaths will be more spread out.

    If, on the other hand, you're losing most of them at close to hatch time, humidity is a big culprit--and I don't just mean humidity right at the end. The humidity throughout the incubation period affects whether live chicks can make it out of their shell or not, because it impacts the size of the air cell.

    So, first things first: What can you tell us about the deaths? Are you candling regularly? When are most of your losses occurring? Are you doing post-mortems and if so, what do you see in the eggs?

    Second, by all means go ahead and insulate your bator like crazy--wrapping towels around it (DON'T block ventilation holes--oxygen deprivation also kills chicks!) is a good start. Move it to a part of the house that stays relatively warm and stable in temp.

    Then start monitoring your eggs throughout incubation and post what you're seeing and what's going on, so we can do more to help you. :)

    Sorry for all your losses. That must be really frustrating. I hope your next hatch is awesome. Good luck!
     
  9. teisenhand

    teisenhand Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 8, 2012
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    Hi guys, I have talked to people who live near me in Colorado who have successful hatches, they suggest very high humidity throughout the incubation period. Starting today, I will start incubating maybe a dozen silkie eggs using this method, I moved my incubator to a different room where there isn't very much activity and put a towel on the side. Hoping for the best!

    And as for my previous hatches, most died in the first 10 days, I got a new thermometer and figured out that my thermometer was actually hotter by 8 degrees!!!! That is probably the major problem, yet about 5 from each batch made it to lockdown, but died [​IMG], I even heard one of them chirping in the shell!!! [​IMG]

    Anyway, I am going to try the method with this batch, 100 degrees, 60% humidity for day 1-18, and even higher humidity during lockdown. I also have a humidifier in the room next to the incubator, and it is not near any vents. I hope the little silkies hatch!!! [​IMG]

    Thank for your help everyone! I will keep you updated on my incubation this time around. If all else fails, im getting a new incubator haha.
     
  10. Bill 101

    Bill 101 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Something wrong here ----- If your original thermometer was 8 degrees hotter, that means that when it read 99 is was actually 91, that might explain why most died in the first 10 days, but I don't know how any of them could make it to the 18th day.. Colorado is generally high altitude & low humidity Temperature & humidity are very important the better you can control those 2, the better your hatches are. I've hatched at high altitude (4500) & low humidity 20%, but was able to hatch just fine using the normal temps & humidity, BUT I had very accurate thermometers, humidity gage (wet bulb) & I forced air incubators
     

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