what should the humidity be?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by ralphs, Feb 15, 2009.

  1. ralphs

    ralphs New Egg

    7
    0
    7
    Feb 9, 2009
    I'm new to this...what should the humidity be and what temp should i store eggs before incubating?
     
  2. B. Saffles Farms

    B. Saffles Farms Mr. Yappy Chickenizer

    Nov 23, 2008
    Madisonville, TN
    Still-air incubator (no fan):101.5 degrees.

    Fan Forced incubator: 99.5 degrees.
    Humidity: 82*-88*F while turning
    90*-94*F the last 3 days. (for wet bulb)

    I store my eggs at room temp. Turning them once a day [​IMG]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 15, 2009
  3. panner123

    panner123 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 15, 2007
    Garden Valley, ca
    Here we go again. Let's settle this once and for all. I agree 100% with the temps given. I disagree 100% with the humidity given. With the humidity that high you will drown the chicks. There is only one way to prove this. Take 2 bators (same make & model) side by side and place 3 dozen eggs in each. Use the temps as stated in both. In one use the humidity as given, in the other set the humidity at 35% for the first 18 days. In this one never let the huidity go below 25% or above 45% and for the last 3 days kick the humidity up to 60%. Don't count any infertile eggs and see which bator produces the most live chicks. In the first your hatch rate should be 5 to 10% if you are lucky. In the second (low humidity) your hatch rate should be at 80% or better. Prove me wrong and I will buy your eggs. Prove me right and enjoy your improved hatch rate and the chicks it produces.
     
  4. tiki244

    tiki244 Flock Mistress

    8,792
    34
    308
    Jan 1, 2008
    WestCentralWisconsin
    Lot of people have differing opinions on the humidity. For someone new to hatching it is important to keep the humidity constant. I have mine at around 40% and raise a little higher from day 18 on. You will find out after a few hatches what works best for you. Make sure you keep the incubator in a draft free location. And check out the learning pages here on BYC to learn more about incubating and hatching eggs,


    I save my eggs at approximately 50-60*. I put them in an egg carton and tilt it at a 45* angle, turning 3 times a day before I set them in the incubator.
     
  5. onthespot

    onthespot Deluxe Dozens

    7,187
    20
    271
    Mar 29, 2008
    Riverside/Norco, CA
    I have tried incbating at 50% and had zero hatch. I have tried "dry incubating, and had a very very poor hatch of dried out, sticky chicks. What has worked best for me has been to try to keep it around as close to 40% humiditiy the first 17 days and up to sixty, sixty five, between that, the last few days. Now my worst issue is with still air, and varying temps, so the eggs hatch sometimes days different from each other due to temperature differences in different parts of the incubator. Sooner or later I will get around to wiring a fan in my bators and I hope to solve that. Good luck with your hatching. You will figure out in time what works for you in your particular weather environment, work schedule, hatching setup, etc... Every setup is unique and you will find balance that works for you by making small adjustments here and there until you get your hatch rate up where you want it.
     
  6. Jamie821

    Jamie821 Chillin' With My Peeps

    484
    3
    131
    Sep 26, 2008
    Niota, Tennessee
    I guess I will give my two cents. In the 80s and 90s is a no no. I use the dry method but even when not using it that is way to high. For the first eighteen days mine never goes over 40 but I average 35, I do not add water until it drops to 25. For the last three days I raise the humidity never over 60 for the reason that at eggs hatching the humidity goes up on its own. Chicks can and do drown if the evaporation does not occur during the first eighteen days. I did a humidity check under a brooding hen and it never went over 44 for the first eighteen days and averaged around 39 to 40 with drops to the low 30s at times. A hen never gets that high of humidity and there must be a reason why not. Do as you want but am just trying to help you have a successful hatch. I just had 100% and a 98% hatch the last two weeks with the numbers I gave. Its up to you.
     
  7. B. Saffles Farms

    B. Saffles Farms Mr. Yappy Chickenizer

    Nov 23, 2008
    Madisonville, TN
    Quote:If youre refering to my post. Its not in the 80% or 90%. Its 82 degrees F to 88 degrees F while turning. and 90 degrees F to 94degrees F the last 3 days. Its for a wet bulb incubator. Just wanted to be clear on that. [​IMG]
     
  8. Jamie821

    Jamie821 Chillin' With My Peeps

    484
    3
    131
    Sep 26, 2008
    Niota, Tennessee
    ok understand
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by