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What the heck!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by tracylhl, Dec 16, 2009.

  1. tracylhl

    tracylhl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 20, 2009
    Myakka City, Florida
    You may remember that I posted this pic about a week and 1/2 ago:
    [​IMG]
    After having her in solitary confinement for a week and treating w/ anti-biotics, there seemed to be no change. I decided that she'd either get better or not but no one else seemed to be sick yet and she seemed to feel fine, eating, etc so I put her back in with the rest.
    I went in this morning and noticed that she was lagging behind the group and my one lone roo was kind of guarding her. I went in this afternoon to find her limping. I decided it was time to put her back into a smaller coop to be alone and when I picked her up, I realized that her left thigh is HUGE (like the size of the rest of her body, almost) and very warm to the touch. I have no idea what is wrong with this little girl. I want to try to help her recover but don't know what (if anything) I can do. My gut tells me I need to cull her but I've never done it and just don't think I'm able yet. Suggestions? Ideas?
     
  2. AmyBella

    AmyBella Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 26, 2009
    Western MA
    I am so sorry that she isn't better! I wish I knew what to do.
     
  3. Kittymomma

    Kittymomma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 9, 2009
    Olympia, WA
    So sorry. If you're not ready/able to cull her you may try treating with stronger injectable antibiotics if you haven't used them already. Does the swelling in her thigh have a noticable bump too or is it general?
     
  4. tracylhl

    tracylhl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 20, 2009
    Myakka City, Florida
    Quote:It's just generally swollen. The shape isn't distorted or anything. Where can I buy stronger injectibles? The two feed stores I've tried both had the same type of "mix w/ water" antibiotics and said it's all they have.
     
  5. Kittymomma

    Kittymomma Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,873
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    Sep 9, 2009
    Olympia, WA
    Quote:It's just generally swollen. The shape isn't distorted or anything. Where can I buy stronger injectibles? The two feed stores I've tried both had the same type of "mix w/ water" antibiotics and said it's all they have.

    I've gotten them online, but you probably don't have time for that. If you have a regular vet you might be able to get them to sell you the antibiotic without bringing the bird in. I've been able to do that in the past when they knew my alternitive was to cull, but that I'd really like to save the animal if possible. It's hard to find a vet that wants to treat chickens, goats, or rabbits anyhow.
     
  6. wildorchid053

    wildorchid053 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 12, 2009
    syracuse area, ny
    i wonder if she hurt herself? i slipped on ice last week and my knee went totally hot and swollen and i am just now starting to walk.. maybe she slipped or fell
     
  7. ErieSpurs

    ErieSpurs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 5, 2009
    Elyria, OH
    It could be a Bott Fly, but I'm not sure. Good Luck.
     
  8. momreda

    momreda Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 31, 2009
    Cumberland Furnace, TN
    Quote:Here is the definition for Bot Fly maybe it will help you determine if it is this or not. I hope your girl gets well.

    Control of Insect and Related Pests of Livestock and Poultry in British Columbia
    Bot Flies
    Hosts: Horses, Donkeys, MulesDescription of Injurious Stages and Damage
    bot fly image Adult flies somewhat resemble honey bees. Their attempts at egg-laying cause hosts to nod their heads. Larvae of all three species attach themselves to the lining of the host's stomach and intestine, interfering with digestion and sometimes blocking passageways.
    Summary of Life History
    Eggs are attached to long hairs on front legs and chest (horse bot), on fine hairs on the host's lips (nose bot), or on the long hairs under the jaws (throat bot). Maggots which hatch from the eggs enter the mouth and move to the stomach and intestine where they remain attached for 8 to 10 months. They are eventually passed in the droppings, pupate in the soil, and adult flies emerge to complete the life cycle of one generation per year.
    Control Recommendations
    Wire nose protectors or canvas strips will prevent egg-laying around the mouth. Provide shaded areas into which the horses can escape the egg-laying female flies. Reduce horse bot infection by washing the front legs and chest with warm water to encourage eggs to hatch. The larvae can then be washed away. Contact a veterinarian for recommended treatments.
     

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