What to do about frostbite when it is still below freezing out?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by kittyacid, Feb 23, 2015.

  1. kittyacid

    kittyacid Chillin' With My Peeps

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    One of my hens has frostbite on her comb and I have read that they should be kept from freezing temperatures until it heals to prevent further damage. This means she will be in the house for the next week because of the weather. Is this what is generally recommended? I am concerned the stress of being alone inside will be bad for her as well. What do most of you do when you have issues with frostbite and the temperatures are still well below freezing out? Thanks.
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    I only get frostbite on the big combed roos. I don't do anything but watch for infection.
    If a hen gets frostbite in NC, you may not have enough ventilation.

    It only got down to 0F here this year but in the past, it's gotten down around -20 and it's always humid. I haven't had frostbite on hens.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2015
  3. kittyacid

    kittyacid Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks. This happened when I had to go out of town for a few days and couldn't clean the droppings board which I do daily. I have a 8 x 10 shed for a coop with two 2 x 2 windows cut into it, semi-covered like a jalousie window. Should I add more?
     
  4. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Last edited: Feb 23, 2015
  5. Bocktobery 10

    Bocktobery 10 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Same here... I don't do anything unless I see infection occurring. I don't think there is much I can do- If I move the chicken out of the coop into someplace warm, this is not good for them if I put them back out into the cold after they heal. I heard that you shouldn't shock a chicken's system by taking them in and putting them back out in the cold. Their bodies get used to the warm (may even shed some feathers) and its a shock to them when you put them back into the cold.

    Anyhoo... that is what I heard. So, just take it with a grain of salt as they say. And definitely watch for signs of infection and the chicken getting ill- listless, acting not themselves, staying still, sneezing, coughing, pus draining from wound.. etc. If those signs show, then I would bring them in someplace warm.

    If you are concerned about the cold, it is true that some breeds do better in bitter cold weather than others. If you google that you will find some lists, I'm sure. Overall though, I think chickens handle cold better than heat. Their feathers are optimal in keeping heat in. Its like wearing a down comforter. I'm always worried about my flock when it reaches to below zero weather, but other than the long combed roos, they do just fine.

    Just keep an eye on your hen's comb. You could put some neosporin on the frostbite- thin layer of it of course.
     
  6. minamisfit

    minamisfit Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Is this frostbite bad? I have 13 chickens and most of them have some sort of frostbite, it's been in the 20s and below zero the past 2 weeks, we have about another 2 weeks before it's not freezing anymore, what do I do with that many chickens?[​IMG]
    (Look at the white chickens comb and waddle) [​IMG][​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2015

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