WHAT TO DO WHEN INTRODUCING NEW CHICKENS TO YOUR FLOCK

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Glenda Heywoodo, Feb 20, 2017.

  1. Glenda Heywoodo

    Glenda Heywoodo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 19, 2016
    Cassville Missouri
    Having raised and bred chickens for many years.
    there are certain rules for introducing new chickens into the existing flock.

    One of the best ways to introduce new hens is to put newcomers in a run / small fenced off area within the existing run so that they can see one another and get used to one another but with the safety of the wire between them. Once a week has passed, the newcomers can be popped into the coop at night, but make sure you are there at first light in the morning to rescue them if blood is drawn.
    Another way is to put them with your existing flock in a house and run that is new to both of them with lots of space and lots of food distractions. Neither of them has an established territory and this can sometimes work well, especially if they have lots of space to stay away from one another at first. This isn’t always possible though.
    read below for the many things to do with this new addition.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2017
  2. Glenda Heywoodo

    Glenda Heywoodo Chillin' With My Peeps

    982
    86
    106
    Dec 19, 2016
    Cassville Missouri
    When introducing new chickens into your flock set up,
    always try and supply new things such as treats,
    such as a head of cabbbge hung from the ceiling with
    chicken wire wrapped around it so they can peck
    it and entertian them selvs.

    Also put new chickens in at night with other chicken on roost pole.
    Thus they get the smell of the other chickens on their feathers
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2017
  3. Glenda Heywoodo

    Glenda Heywoodo Chillin' With My Peeps

    982
    86
    106
    Dec 19, 2016
    Cassville Missouri
    Quarantine for Disease. Yes, they look healthy but trust me, I’ve had the heartbreak of destroying the flock after I brought disease into it with new birds. Ideally they need to go into a separate run for at least 2 weeks. Observed them to make sure you don’t bring a disease into the flock.
    • Only introduce birds that are a similar size. Youngsters will get bullied, they need to be fully mature to stand up for themselves. Watch the size of birds. A little bantam added to a flock of large fowl will probably be hard work.
    • If possible, divide the run up for a while, get a roll of chicken wire and lash up a make-shift fence or use a chicken fencing kit like this one from Omlet to give the newcomers an area of their own to settle in. Your established flock will get used to the sight, smell and sound of the new arrivals.
    • Add a distraction. Hang a CD and some spring greens from different places in the run. It works wonders!
    • Ensure there are adequate food containers. The chickens that are getting bullied need to eat and if they won’t come out of the house, they will soon have problems if they can’t get to food. Make sure the new arrivals have had food and water before they are introduced.
    • Space. Give birds as much space as possible. Can you let the flock free range into the garden for a while? A bird that gets pecked can run off and get away easily if there are places for to do so.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2017
  4. Glenda Heywoodo

    Glenda Heywoodo Chillin' With My Peeps

    982
    86
    106
    Dec 19, 2016
    Cassville Missouri
    One of the best ways to introduce new hens is to put newcomers in a run / small fenced off area within the existing run so that they can see one another and get used to one another but with the safety of the wire between them. Once a week has passed, the newcomers can be popped into the coop at night, but make sure you are there at first light in the morning to rescue them if blood is drawn.
    Another way is to put them with your existing flock in a house and run that is new to both of them with lots of space and lots of food distractions. Neither of them has an established territory and this can sometimes work well, especially if they have lots of space to stay away from one another at first. This isn’t always possible though.
    Here is a list of things to remember when introducing new birds:
    • Quarantine for Disease. Yes, they look healthy but trust me, I’ve had the heartbreak of destroying the flock after I brought disease into it with new birds. Ideally they need to go into a separate run for at least 2 weeks. Observed them to make sure you don’t bring a disease into the flock.
    • Only introduce birds that are a similar size. Youngsters will get bullied, they need to be fully mature to stand up for themselves. Watch the size of birds. A little bantam added to a flock of large fowl will probably be hard work.
    • If possible, divide the run up for a while, get a roll of chicken wire and lash up a make-shift fence or use a chicken fencing kit like this one from Omlet to give the newcomers an area of their own to settle in. Your established flock will get used to the sight, smell and sound of the new arrivals.
    • Add a distraction. Hang a CD and some spring greens from different places in the run. It works wonders!
    • Ensure there are adequate food containers. The chickens that are getting bullied need to eat and if they won’t come out of the house, they will soon have problems if they can’t get to food. Make sure the new arrivals have had food and water before they are introduced.
    • Space. Give birds as much space as possible. Can you let the flock free range into the garden for a while? A bird that gets pecked can run off and get away easily if they have the space to do so.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2017

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