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What to do with a mismatched chick?

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by lindaroot, Jan 27, 2015.

  1. lindaroot

    lindaroot New Egg

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    I am new at this and I made mistakes. My neophite husband ordered hatching eggs on ebay--pendesencas and silkies. Since he is bedridden, I became the conscripted chicken lady. At first I was livid, but when the first eggs hatched, I became a dedicated chicken person. Of the first batch of 11, three hatched and I learned a lot about the unreliability of incubators during the process, so I had another on hand for the silkies,of which only one out of 10 hatched. The eggs were filthy when they arrived, and on candling at 11 days and again at 17 , only one showed signs of being fertile. That egg produced my great friend Blackie, who unfortunately was hatched ten days after the penedesencas and they did not mix well. Since then (late October) I have hatched five out of 7 Buff Orpingtons and one more Pennie (1 of 5) and they are in a coop outside and doing well, but not when I try to add Blackie to the mix first they were afraid of him and then they began to terrorize him. ( Blackie was hatched on 10/25 and I am convined is a roo) . I have tried on several occasions to acclimate him to my latest batch of silkies, born on Christmas) but he refuses to share his space with them.

    Blackie is a spoiled brat. He wants to eat only people food from my hand, and that is my fault, not his.If I were to do it over again, I would have purchase him a couple of day old companions, but none were available locally.. The problem for which I seek advice, is what to do with him? I am thinking of calling him what he is--a pampered pet and perhaps gettting him a small coop of his own, t with or without access to the common run--a bachelor pad. I have determined he will be one of my 2 permitted roos, for no other reason than I am so attached to him. If need be, I can house him on a patio out of sight of the hens.

    Anyone with suggests, please help me out here.

    I have learned a great deal since I began this project in September when my husband bid on the eggs.
    If I were to this over, I would buy nothing but what I needed to incubate the hatching eggs and spend the three weeks while they were hatching on sites like this. I would have done several things differently in addition to researching the pros and cons of different incubators.

    One we started with penedesencas, we planned to hatch the sikie we already had in incubation, and stick with penedesencas. The problem there was the popularity of the breed and the total unavailability of day old pennie chicks or hatching pennie eggs. Because we sought good eggers, we added the Orpingtons. At this point, I should have consulted the Henderson chart and other sources, and if I had, I would have ordered a more expensive much taller coop than what I did. Orphingtons are very large birds, folks.

    i have spent a fortune on poorly engineered waterers and feeders, and my advice there is to buy a good medium capacity hanging feeder as soon as your chicks are old enough to leave the brooder. Also, I recommend elevating the waterer and looking carefully at the size in comparison to the square footage of the coop and run. 'Run'implies room to do more than climb over other chicks to get to foraging space.

    Another problem I will be facing is what to do with my excess penedesenca roo. There's more to this than reading blogs and buying stuff from Amazon.
     
  2. HighStreetCoop

    HighStreetCoop Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This seems like a reasonable plan to me. If you search the forum, you'll find threads for people with "house chickens". They might have useful advice for you.
     
  3. sunflour

    sunflour Flock Master Premium Member

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    [​IMG] Glad you have joined us. Sounds like you have gotten a lot of learning the hard way. You will have to decide if you want to try to keep Blackie. You can post a photo on what breed/gender is this to get opinions on if he is a roo. It may be difficult to give him up since he is so attached to you, and sounds like this is mutual. If you plan to keep Blackie - he/she will be a lot happier with the flock instead of living separately. If you can manage the room to place Blackie where they can all see but not touch each other for a few weeks, you may be able to get the flock to accept him/her.

    Good luck, I hope you find a way to work this out.
     
  4. BantamFan4Life

    BantamFan4Life Out of the Woods Premium Member

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    Welcome to BYC! I'm glad you joined us!
     
  5. justplainbatty

    justplainbatty Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hello, welcome to BYC! You will learn a lot here. Blackie is a little old for your Christmas hatches. young roos are as selfish as any hen. I would suggest keeping him separated from the hens until they are 4 or 5 months old. He will be more ready to act like a rooster then and at 5 months the hens will be close to laying. They will be more receptive to him then. They will still fight as they organize a pecking order. The hens will run from him at first. Over time he will, rise to the top of the order, assert his dominance over them and they will start to squat instead of running. Chicken mating is a bit rough, nothing pretty at all. He will jump on the hen's back, bite her head feathers, rake his feet into their backs, wiggle around and then jump off and walk away. The hen will puff up, shake out her feathers and walk away too. If you are able to separate him in a way where he is very near the hens, they will get to know each other w/o touching until everyone is ready. In the mean time, try to back down a bit on the hand feeding and up the regular feeding style which will encourage the foraging and sharing instinct that the hens will be looking for. I hope this helps. [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    [​IMG] I'm glad you joined us!
     
  7. Kelsie2290

    Kelsie2290 True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    Hello :frow and Welcome To BYC! X3 When ever combining or adding birds it is usually best to wait until the birds are the same size (or until bantams are as big as they are going to get) and have a long period of the two flocks being able to see each other but no touching, through wire seem to work best, ie dividing the coop into two sections or keeping the new/younger ones in a cage inside the coup for a couple of weeks to a month at least. The chickens will get to know each other and sort of work out a pecking order before actually coming in contact with each other. After a week or two, letting them free range together is a good idea and should help... It will take a couple of weeks to get the pecking order sorted out. There is a nice article in the Learning Center on integrating flocks you might like to check out, the part about actually combining them is after the quarantine section https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/adding-to-your-flock
    With roos, adolescent cockerels especially are often big idiots and a real pain to deal with, they usually do grow out of it luckily... a lot of people have bachelor pads for extra or pet roos just so they don't have to deal with them annoying the pullets. https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/299187/people-with-house-chickens There are quite a few threads on House Chickens as HighStreetCoop mentioned... Silkies are popular.
    You will probably wind up having to have separate coops for the Silkies and the other birds, they often do not mix well with other breeds and are prone to getting picked on.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2015
  8. Mountain Peeps

    Mountain Peeps Change is inevitable, like the seasons Premium Member

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    Welcome to BYC! Please make yourself at home and we are here to help.

    X2 on the advice and links provided above.

    Best of luck![​IMG]
     
  9. ChickyChickens

    ChickyChickens Chickening Around

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    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Welcome to BYC!!! There are loads of members on here…so if you have ANY questions…just ASK!!!

    Hope you have loads of fun and all your answers answered here on BYC the BEST CHICKEN KEEPING FORUM on EARTH!!

    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  10. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    Welcome to BYC! [​IMG]I'm glad you joined us.

    You've received some good advice already! Good luck with your flock and especially with "Blackie"![​IMG]
     

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