what to do with eggs during worming

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by allison finch, Nov 28, 2009.

  1. allison finch

    allison finch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I just wormed my birds with Wazine, today. I know I can't eat the eggs. Is it for 2 weeks? Can I scramble the eggs and feed them to the chickens? After all, the eggs will contain what the birds were given, right? I just hate throwing them away, if they can be of some protein benefit to my birds.
     
  2. chandasue

    chandasue Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I couldn't find an answer on this either. I toss the eggs for a week just to be safe (or scramble them for the dog if I'm feeling generous.) My mom grew up on a farm and remembers that they never tossed eggs even after worming. Maybe they didn't know back then, or maybe it's fine to eat them... She turned out ok. [​IMG]
     
  3. allison finch

    allison finch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:LOL!! Are you sure??
     
  4. bibliophile birds

    bibliophile birds Chillin' With My Peeps

    i would toss them completely until you are sure the dewormer is gone. i wouldn't feed them to my animals. how the chemicals are changed in the body is not well known and it could cause unforeseen problems.

    as for people who used to eat the eggs, dewormers have changed significantly over the years. parasites are building up resistance to everything because of prolonged use and therefore the dewormers used today are much stronger than what people 20, 30, 50 years ago would have been exposed to.

    there are several natural dewormer alternatives (such as pumpkin and coconut) that you can use. you wouldn't need to dispose of the eggs then, and you'd be helping to stop chemical companies from controlling our food sources.
     
  5. accio! chickens

    accio! chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I throw mine in the compost bin... tossed 30 eggs today [​IMG]

    Anyone know how long to throw them? my Ivermec says that in dairy cows you should throw out the milk for 2 weeks i think..
     
  6. lngrid

    lngrid Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Newbie's question: how is it that something as old and mild as pumpkin and coconut can be effective against worms when today's dewormers have to be much stronger than the ones people began using INSTEAD of pumpkin and coconut all those years ago?

    I'm not trying to me a smart-alec. I really would like to understand chicken care.
     
  7. Steve_of_sandspoultry

    Steve_of_sandspoultry Overrun With Chickens

    We just hard boil them and feed them back to the birds.

    Steve in NC
     
  8. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Newbie's question: how is it that something as old and mild as pumpkin and coconut can be effective against worms when today's dewormers have to be much stronger than the ones people began using INSTEAD of pumpkin and coconut all those years ago?

    I'm not an expert on deworming, natural or otherwise, but I'll give an opinion. Take it for what is is worth, which may not be much.

    There are several different types of worms. The different worms need different treatments. What is effective on some worms may not be effective on others. And like antibiotics, some treatments are fairly mild, which means they are pretty specific in what they go after and some are very strong, which means they are a broadband and will treat a lot of different types of worms. So "worming" can mean different things to different people.

    Not sure if it is correct or not, but it is certainly possible some strains of worms have built up a resistance to certain treatments.

    Like a lot of things, chickens having worms is not unusual. A low level infestation is not that big a deal to them. It is when the numbers build up that it becomes a problem. And if you ever notice that you have a problem, you do have a sufficiently heavy load that you need to treat. Some of the natural dewormers may reduce the numbers to where it is not a problem instead of totally erradicating them. The only way to know for sure that the specific worms have been erradicated is to have a vet run the specific test. Many people deworm once or twice a year, whether there is an indication or not, just as insurance to try to keep the numbers down.

    I do a lot of gardening. I am not certified organic and never will be. I do not just throw insecticides at anything and everything, but if I identify a specific problem and determine a certain insecticide is called for, I will use it. I don't want to spark an organic versus not organic debate, but some of the organic methods include planting enough for me and the insects or have ways to reduce, not eliminate the problem. Some natural dewormers may control, not eliminate, the problem.

    I've also read the stories about the herd of wild horses that had worms and six months later were wormfree, supposedly because of a natural dewormer. I personally find this story plausible because wild animals have been thriving for thousands of years with worms without our help or treatment. But wild animals are not penned up where their poop builds up and increases the parasite load beyond manageable levels. Ours are not wild animals but are kept in circumstances where we need to help protect them from parasites and diseases.

    We all have different circumstances of how we keep our birds. Some are penned and contained and some are allowed to virtually be "wild". We have different levels of what is acceptable, both in treatment and in results. If the chickens are healthy then the infestation has been controlled even if all worms are not eliminated. Different levels of infestation by different types of worms call for different treatments. And pumpkin or coconut or garlic or whatever you believe in is not readily available, at least economically, to everyone at all times, whether 40 years ago or now.

    As I said, I am not an expert and I don't know how these natural dewormers work, whether they inhibit reproduction of the worms, kill or paralyze them, or just flush them out of the system with a laxative-type effect. We do have different set-ups, different problems, and different expectations. I would expect different things to work differently for us.

    As I said, this is just my opinion. Don't count on any of this as being 100% accurate or think I have any special knowledge. I don't. But I have an opinion.
     
  9. lngrid

    lngrid Chillin' With My Peeps

    Thank you, ridgerunner, for the effort you put into that answer. It was very well thought-out and thought-provoking. I'm wanting Santa to bring me books on chicken-care, now. [​IMG]
     
  10. chandasue

    chandasue Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:LOL!! Are you sure??

    [​IMG] Actually now that you mention it... We always thought it was just because she was from SD that she's so weird... JK

    Good to know that wormers are stronger now than what they used to be, but still, WHY don't they put something on the bottle suggesting a time period to discard eggs?
     

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