What to do with rooster?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by bluerose, Oct 22, 2007.

  1. bluerose

    bluerose Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 21, 2007
    San Diego, CA
    I got 4 week-old chicks in mid-June- 3 buff Orps and 1 Rhode Island Red. One of the Orps is a boy, I'm sure (tail not nearly as fluffy, slightly smaller, much bigger comb/wattles, have heard bits and pieces of crowing).

    I don't want chicks, don't want fertilized eggs, don't want a rooster period... but this guy is rapidly becoming a sweetheart. No, he will not become food.

    It wouldn't be a huge deal to separate him- but I don't think that's necessarily very nice, to have him all by himself... even if he shared a fence with the girls. How do roosters who are raised with hens do when they're separated? I might be able to wrangle getting a buddy for him- what's 5 instead of 4 chickens anyway?- but I dunno if I could find a roo to get along with him. I just hope he's quiet, we have neighbors.

    I would probably be able to find him a new home, but I don't want to... I like him!

    Caponing would be an option, except that with what I've read, by the time they're this age (5mo) it doesn't usually end up well.

    He needs a new name, though. I named 'her' Little Hen for the time being when I got them, and it stuck... so I need name suggestions. (The other ladies are Diva, Amber, and Miss Red, if it makes a difference.)


    Thanks guys....
     
  2. Queen of the Lilliputians

    Queen of the Lilliputians Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 5, 2007
    Maine
    We didn't think we wanted a rooster, either. dh was dead set against it.. until I got one. And then that roo was killed... and we decided we HAD to have another.

    I love my chickens. Chickens are amusing and cute. But roosters add something different. They are sweet, sharing (most of the time!) their food with their ladies, watching out for danger, keeping everyone together and safe. They can help control bickering. Overall, I think they just add a new dimension to the coop. My cock is not aggressive with the ladies. He is considerate, and friendly with them. Granted, he's a bantam, and my ladies are full size, but to date we have no bare backs, no blood. He doesn't take crap from them, though, and will peck them if they peck him, but he doesn't chase after them unless he feels they are wandering too far. He also makes sure my little bantam pullet gets a chance to eat and drink by keeping the big ladies at a distance while she's at the food (if not for him, she would be in the house most of the time, poor girl).

    You can still eat the fertilized eggs, and they taste just like.. eggs!

    I do understand not wanting the cockeral, but my suggestion would be give him a try and see how it goes. If he is aggressive with the hens, or you can't stand the crowing, rehome him (or set him up in a bachelor pad). But you might find (like we did) that you can't imagine your flock without him.

    -Meghan
     
  3. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    May 7, 2007
    Forks, Virginia
    Quote:There is no difference in the eggs that are fertilized and not fertilized. Collect them daily and store them in the fridge.

    Quote:One of the buff orpingtons is more likely to go broody than the other female. You don't have to let her sit and hatch eggs just make sure you collect the eggs daily.

    Quote:If you separate him from the flock he will be one lonely and miserable rooster. Left in with the flock he will learn to guard and protect the girls. Males are preprogrammed to rule the hen house. He will protect and lead and the hens will respect and follow him.

    Besides that roosters sure are pretty. If yours is a BO cockeral he should feather out into a very handsome rooster.

    You like the little fella. Why not keep him?
     
  4. Southern28Chick

    Southern28Chick Flew The Coop

    Apr 16, 2007
    Quote:There is no difference in the eggs that are fertilized and not fertilized. Collect them daily and store them in the fridge.

    Quote:One of the buff orpingtons is more likely to go broody than the other female. You don't have to let her sit and hatch eggs just make sure you collect the eggs daily.

    Quote:If you separate him from the flock he will be one lonely and miserable rooster. Left in with the flock he will learn to guard and protect the girls. Males are preprogrammed to rule the hen house. He will protect and lead and the hens will respect and follow him.

    Besides that roosters sure are pretty. If yours is a BO cockeral he should feather out into a very handsome rooster.

    You like the little fella. Why not keep him?

    I was going to answer but MissPrissy already said exactly what I was going to say. [​IMG] And I'll add: I LOVE MY ROOSTER!!!!! Can't you tell by my avatar.
     
  5. bluerose

    bluerose Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 21, 2007
    San Diego, CA
    OK.. so can someone explain the diff between fertilized and unfertilized other than one might become a chick?

    Is it technically not fertilized unless there's a rooster around and it's been sat on?




    Off to get ready to evac from the fires.....
     
  6. BeckyLa

    BeckyLa Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 11, 2007
    N. Louisiana
    Good luck with the evacuation. I hope you can take your animals and birds with you!

    He's been named Little Hen, you could change it to

    Little Roo
    Little Man
    Tiny
    etc
     
  7. texaschickmama

    texaschickmama Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 19, 2007
    Poolville, TX
    bluerose, you better get your stuff and take care of yourself, but the answer to your question about fertilized eggs..... if the roo and the hen you know do the deed then like the 2nd egg to come you can count on being fertile. You can eat fertile eggs just like nonfertile ones. If you have a broody hen that will sit on them, then you could have some chicks. I hope I answered you quesitons, you go and take care of yourself and your belongings.
     
  8. Cara

    Cara Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 30, 2007
    NM
    A fertilized egg has the potential to become a chick, but will not unless it is sat on by a hen or incubated. They don't taste any different and the only way to tell the difference is a tiny white bullseye on the yolk, which you can't notice unless you really look for it.

    A rooster friend for the rooster is a bad idea. If he's used to being the only one, you'll probably end up with your own cock fighting ring in your backyard.
     
  9. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    May 7, 2007
    Forks, Virginia
    Quote:Exactly as Cara has written.
     
  10. bluerose

    bluerose Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 21, 2007
    San Diego, CA
    We're all safe, for the moment. There's a potential evac notice going out for where we are now... hennies and mr roo are in a papered blocked-off corner of hallway in the office... they pulled through just fine, they spent several hours in boxes in my car... cockatiel is less than happy in his box (he has food/water/millet and his ladder to hang out on though) but he'll live.

    Kitty is in the conference room with a makeshift litter box and dogs are hanging out with us.

    We got SUPER lucky with the horses and found space for all of them.




    This is all very interesting- it makes total sense but I guess I've just had too much mammalian biology...

    We will see. I have had a few people say to get rid of him before he gets mean- I don't know, to be honest.



    Thanks guys. [​IMG]
     

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