What type of goat breed should I get for 4-h?

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by goats rule 101, Aug 26, 2013.

  1. goats rule 101

    goats rule 101 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am looking for a breed of goat to get for 4-h. I want a small breed that is somewhat easy to handle and that will make good pets. I was thinking nigerians but I don't want to milk them. Is there a way I can show them without having to milk them? Also any information on showing rouen ducks and wyandotte chickens would be helpful.
    Thanks Hannah H. :D
     
  2. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    I am not a goat expert, so I can't help you there. However, I can tell you about showing your types of poultry.

    First of all, type (the body structure of a fowl, unique to each breed) is very important with Wyandottes. A good Wyandotte will have a nice broad back, round, full tail, wide skull, and sturdy legs. In fact, they are often described as a "bird of curves" because every part of their body should be rounded. Some common disqualifications of Wyandottes include: inverted spike (when the spike of the rose-comb indents into the base of the comb), a foreign comb variety (Wyandottes are supposed to have rose-combs), stubs (downy feathers) on the legs, and underweight (Wyandottes should weigh at least six pounds).

    To get show-quality Wyandottes, it is essential that you buy from a breeder, and not from a hatchery. Hatchery birds are often below standard weight, have narrow, triangular tails, and may have the wrong type of comb or leg color. Birds like these will be marked down at shows, and may even be disqualified.

    In the case of the Silver-Laced color pattern, the lacing should be even throughout the body. The feathers should be free from frosting (when the black margin on each feather fades to white on the edges), mossiness (irregular, indistinct, or messy looking markings on a feather that disrupt or destroy the intended color pattern), and too thick/thin lacing.

    For more info on the Wyandotte breed, to the Wyandotte Breeders of America website: http://www.wyandottebreedersofamerica.net/


    As for Rouen ducks, I admit that I am not a duck expert. However, I do know a few things. Most importantly, size (like with the Wyandotte) matters. Rouens are large ducks, with deep keels. They should have well-built, yet thick heads and necks, with legs that are strong enough to support their weight. Some disqualifications of ducks include scoop-bill, which is when the bill, instead of being concave on top, is shaped more like a shovel, and angel wing, which is when one or more wings turn outward instead of lying flat. Leg and beak color is also important.

    Hope I've helped! [​IMG] Good luck with getting goats and showing!
     
  3. goats rule 101

    goats rule 101 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you so much that was extremely helpful!!!:)
     
  4. Learningstill

    Learningstill Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You can show Nigerians without milking. If you don't breed, they do not produce milk. Look into if your county has wether classes. My daughter shows wethers (castated bucks) in showmanship, suitability, pack, obstacle, and cart. The doe's have other classes, but not as much fun as our boys.

    She also shows ducks. I am unsure why you only named rouens, so I will explain things to think about. The size of bird compared to you, friendliness of the breed, if it fits breed standard, and what age of bird when you select it as your show bird. Wish you the best.
     
  5. goats rule 101

    goats rule 101 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You can show Nigerians without milking. If you don't breed, they do not produce milk. Look into if your county has wether classes. My daughter shows wethers (castated bucks) in showmanship, suitability, pack, obstacle, and cart. The doe's have other classes, but not as much fun as our boys.

    She also shows ducks. I am unsure why you only named rouens, so I will explain things to think about. The size of bird compared to you, friendliness of the breed, if it fits breed standard, and what age of bird when you select it as your show bird. Wish you the best.[/quote












    Thank you I will have to look in to that are your wethers nigerians or are they a different breed?
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2013
  6. 2jsbabyfarm

    2jsbabyfarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I had pygmy goats for my sae project when I was in FFA. The are small, and are extremely friendly, and dont need to be milked ;)
     
  7. goats rule 101

    goats rule 101 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Cool ill have to put pygmys into consideration!:D
     
  8. Learningstill

    Learningstill Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Our wethers are nigerian. We bottle fed them and they were distant when we first got them, because the breeder was in the process of moving when they chose to enter this world. They still became little lovers. This year our judge made the kids call their goat while standing a distance across from them and my daughter's came second, the first goat person was bribing with a treat.

    What we have seen and what we have heard is the Pygmy breed is a little more bull-headed than the Nigerians.

    Is there a reason you want such a small breed? There are others which would make good options.
     
  9. goats rule 101

    goats rule 101 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Any breed would be fine I just prefered the smaller breeds. I just went to the state fair and saw all the different breeds and now I'm thinking either nigerians still or alpines and possibly nubians. Do you no anything about them?


    Also my profile picture is my neighbors goats and they are pygmy Nigerian cross and I thought they were cute because they were small. Now I realize that the big breeds are just as fun. :) Thanks for help so far too!;)
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2013
  10. Learningstill

    Learningstill Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I do know some about each breed, because we researched all before deciding on Nigerians.

    What do you want them for besides show? Like what do you value?

    For us, we wanted quiet, overly friendly - almost cuddly, not escape determined, sociable with other species of animal, non-aggressive pet goats. The size did not matter at the time because my daughter was small. She has grown a little since and has mentioned she wishes they were a little bigger during fair only. :)

    We like the alpine too, but they tend to be higher strung. Although they are known for being one of the only breeds to be in tune with their trainer, even to the point of eye contact. They make good show goats.

    She has a girl in her club who has and shows Nubians. We really like them, but have noticed they are more territorial than other breeds. They also are known for being a stubborn breed and they are noisy and loud.

    A breed that you may want to look into in addition to the Nigerians, and alpines are the Oberhaslis. They are known for being mellow and pleasant. They seem to show well too. My daughter's club also has these.

    Also, if you do not already know, you will have to get more than one goat, because they are pack animals and need the companionship. Which makes having them that much more fun to watch :)

    Good luck. Feel free to ask if you have any more questions.
     

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