What vaccines do you recommend?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Brad7558, Dec 28, 2008.

  1. Brad7558

    Brad7558 Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 14, 2008
    MN
    I'm looking into raising chickens and other poultry. I research everything I can before I do something. I've noticed many different vac's out there but would like to know what the most common and effective one or one's would be. Of course worming is on the list.
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2008
  2. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    The common ones are Mericks and Cocci.

    I don't vaccine mine for mericks and in many small flocks it is not reccomended. However, Mericks is not an issue in this area so another reason I have no plans in vaccinating them. It is known to be an effective vaccine though.

    As for cocci. It is in all soils. With slow exposure to the protozoa in the soil, they will gain an immunity to it naturally in the first few months of life. They thrive in wet soil, so keep the runs dryer and should be fine. Cocci vaccine was developed for the organic market that says no drugs can be used. Amprol and Sulmet are often used to treat infestations of this protozoa, with amrprol being a thamine blocker that inhibits the growth of the protozoa, does not stop it from infecting the bird, thus if the conditions are bad and lots are in the soil, they can still get sick from it.

    Worming, is another thing you don't have to do. If you are dead set on worming them, take a fecal sample to the vet. They can tell you what kinds of worms they have if they have any, as not all wormers work on the same types of worms. Furthermore, worming is hard on the intestines, and so the less you treat, and not treating when not necessary is better. I've had birds for 10+ years and have never wormed any of them. Just plain not necessary and birds do just fine.

    I peronsally think less is more. Let them play out in the dirt and build up their own immunities to the local bugs and stuff you have in your yard. Every flock has their own balance of bactera and microorganisms, and will develop a strong resistance to it, and gain a natural balance.

    Good luck!
     
  3. Brad7558

    Brad7558 Out Of The Brooder

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    I do agree less is more, but I plan on raising them on my father-in-laws farm. There is some livestock present. He's kinda out of the game now, but I don't want to infect his stock in any way.
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2008
  4. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    If you only brood up and raise from chicks, there shouldn't be an issue. Just don't bring in adult birds. Mericks and cocci are both species specific, along with many types of worms.
     
  5. Brad7558

    Brad7558 Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 14, 2008
    MN
    Quote:Thank you for the info. Can these be passed on in the gene pool?
     
  6. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    By passed on in the gene pool, as in can immunity be inherited?

    Immunity to things like cocci and resistance to worms and such are developed in the chick over time. Exposure to a mother hen or adult birds can expidite the process though. However.... birds who can adapt fast and so on, can pass it on to future generations IF and only IF you cull out the ones who get sick, weak, or otherwise not as strong in your flock.

    There are a few diseases and such that can be passed via egg, but I'd have to say like 95% of the possible things that can happen to your flock are highly unlikly and risk is small.
     

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