What went wrong?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by chicknmania, Dec 14, 2007.

  1. chicknmania

    chicknmania Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Well, Thing One gave up. Her eggs were due to hatch on the 11th; she deserted the nest on the 13th, and went back to her regular roost. We candled the eggs (she had about 12) and they were not all hers. There were no embryos in any of them. She was not in a traditional nest box but an old bicycle cart that they all adore for setting. It is surrounded on most sides, has straw, and is in the barn so it is sheltered. We have had two other hens use this for setting; one was successful, the other would've been, but a raccoon got her and her eggs and mostly developed chicks inside a few days before they were to hatch. (We have corrected that problem)...Both of the other hens were also setting during the colder weather. So what happened? Thing One was very faithful on the nest. Is this a fertility glitch in our roosters? Or was it just too cold? We were very dissapointed because we had Christmas chicks last year and we were very much looking forward to these, after Uno's death, especially.
     
  2. Cuban Longtails

    Cuban Longtails Flock Mistress

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    Could have been anything from it being too cold to the eggs not having been fertile to begin with.
     
  3. chicknmania

    chicknmania Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Yes, I'm wondering if we should've had a heat light on her? Other poultry farmers in this area don't seem to do that, though. It's hard to believe NO eggs were fertile...I mean, we have nine roosters....and she hung out with just one roo, and I know they were cozy, so...he has fathered babies before. Oh, well, maybe next time. [​IMG] Does anyone know if a heat light would help, or would that make it too hot?
     
  4. Cuban Longtails

    Cuban Longtails Flock Mistress

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    Maybe she was like SpeckledHen's Miranda, who has fertile eggs but will not develop when they're incubated. Have you been able to get chicks from her eggs in the past? As for the heat lamp, I think as long as the nests are protected from drafts they'll be fine. I had a pullet hatch out babies in a nest in the woods, but it was early November and the weather really didn't dip down past 50s at night.
     
  5. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Sometimes, contrary to what you may think, fertility can go down when you have alot of roosters. They fight and compete and no one gets anything done. The hens start hiding from them because there are just so many after them and little actual mating gets done.
     
  6. peeps7

    peeps7 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 26, 2007
    North Carolina
    I agree with speckledhen(But who wouldn't? She knows EVERYTHING!!!!LOL).
     
  7. Cuban Longtails

    Cuban Longtails Flock Mistress

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    Quote:This is true, as I currently have too many roosters (five more than I need). My pullets and hens are running and hiding, going to the bantam roos for protection. It's a rather stressful situation that will soon be remedied.
     
  8. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    She knows EVERYTHING!!!!LOL

    Good thing you put that "LOL" after your statement! Who started that rumor anyway?! [​IMG]
     
  9. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    Is it possible that the eggs got too chilled for too long when they were collecting this year before she set?
     
  10. chicknmania

    chicknmania Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    I don't think they got too chilled; maybe some, but you'd still think some would hatch. I think too many roos is probably the best guess. We keep trying to acquire more hens, but they have had a high mortality rate lately, unfortunately.
     

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