What won't ducks eat?

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by SwedishDude99, Oct 20, 2013.

  1. SwedishDude99

    SwedishDude99 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I was wondering what plants a duck won't eat? I was specifically wondering if they would or could eat any type of Palm. Any other plants you know your ducks won't eat is helpful too! I want to fill their yard with plants they (hopefully) won't touch. Of course I will put some in that I know they like to encourage foraging, but I want to still be able to keep it looking nice. Thankyou all for the help! :)
     
  2. Amiga

    Amiga Overrun with Runners Premium Member

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    Generally speaking, I have found they don't mess much with shrubs or plants that are taller than two feet. Some they still like, though, like the kiwi vine, so I have the bottom two feet encircled by hardware cloth.

    The more time mine spend in an area, the more they are likely to nibble on a plant. So what works for me is to have a low fence with plants on the other side of that. The kiwi and grape vines do fine inside the ducks' yard. So do the hazelnuts. And I think the blueberries would be okay, too.
     
  3. SwedishDude99

    SwedishDude99 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ok thankyou, the palms I want to get are already pretty tall so I think they will be fine. As for kiwi, I never knew that grew on a vine! Might have to try that one. :)
     
  4. Amiga

    Amiga Overrun with Runners Premium Member

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    I grow a hardy kiwi. You need a male and female plant for fruit, but they are indeed hardy. And yummy, according to the ducks [​IMG]
     
  5. SwedishDude99

    SwedishDude99 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Is it the kiwi that you would buy at the store to eat, or something else? I love kiwi, so fingers crossed. :fl
     
  6. Amiga

    Amiga Overrun with Runners Premium Member

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    If you love the brown tropical kiwi, I think you will love the hardy kiwi more, since it tastes so similar and it can grow in your yard. It has smooth green skin and is smaller, but the insides are just about the same taste.

    This is a tiny bit of what we had this year. I have a cedar post arbor.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. SwedishDude99

    SwedishDude99 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Alright thankyou. That would be amazing to have in the yard. So is it like a vine where you could make it grow upwards and use it like a sort of shade? I would like to be able to do that. :D
     
  8. SwedishDude99

    SwedishDude99 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Also, another question. If a plant had thorns or spikes on it, would that be harmful to them? I've heard of people having rose bushes in their yards, but I wanted to be sure so as not to hurt them.
     
  9. Amiga

    Amiga Overrun with Runners Premium Member

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    This plant is perfect for them. No thorns, non-toxic, I have heavy cedar posts like the frame of a shed, and the kiwi will completely cover it. Already this year, it grew over the posts to make a little "cave" so it provides shade. It is gorgeous, in my opinion. The fruit hangs down within my reach. Some of it within reach of the ducks, though I don't recall seeing them take any off the vine. Ripe fruit drops to the earth. (It is harvested a little green, then you can let it ripen on the counter or put in the frij to slow down the ripening, which is nice because a mature vine can produce hundreds of fruits - they are large grape size).

    Just be sure to use very sturdy untreated wood - cedar or locust - as the vine can get very heavy when it is mature.
     

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