What would you do with your extra cockerels? Caponize?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by eatmorechicken, Dec 22, 2010.

  1. eatmorechicken

    eatmorechicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Do nothing and let them grow into roosters

    Give them away

    Butcher them before they get tough

    Learn how to caponize

    Hire a caponizer or vet, if the price is very reasonable


    So what would you do and why. I would have made these options a poll but I'm not a GFM. oh well. Also what is your interest level in caponizing. Is it worth your time, effort, and money?

    For those who don’t know what a capon is, it is the surgical castration of a cockerel (young rooster)


    [​IMG]


    Pros

    Capons do not chase hens; no sexual activity
    They are not aggressive (no fighting)
    More docile and easy to handle
    There meat is more fattened and tender than intact roosters
    Capons are slightly larger than their intact counterparts when they are mature
    Some breeds will display broodiness and foster chicks

    Cons

    Possibility of losing a bird during the operation
    Slips sometimes occur (not fully caponized cockerel)
    Some capons crow
    They do not grow any faster than their intact counterparts
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2010
  2. DianeS

    DianeS Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What would I, personally, do if I had cockerels? Ones I'd had from the egg/day olds and I discovered were cockerels one day?

    I'd probably just let them grow until I got hungry for chicken that tasted better than store-bought. Then I'd probably process them all in the same day - if I'm going to get the whole setup out and use it, it needs to be worth it. So somewhere between figuring out they were male and them becoming fully adult.
     
  3. ChickieBooBoo

    ChickieBooBoo Cold Canadian Chick

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    I would put them in the freezer, you'll be eating fresh, homegrown chicken that you raised yourself.
     
  4. Sunny Side Up

    Sunny Side Up Count your many blessings...

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    This is a good question for everyone hatching chicks, it usually results in more cockerels than a person can keep. At first I would sell the extras for $5 apiece, then when my buyers spoke so highly of home-grown meat, it made me want to learn how to process them for myself. After I learned to process, I could keep the cockerels until they were about 20-24 weeks of age, and bring them to the table then. They are not at all tough at that age.

    Recently I learned how to caponize, and have begun doing that to the cockerel chicks. It's not really that difficult to learn, and there's information on this forum & other places online to get instructions. I think I will continue to do this when time allows, otherwise I'll let them grow out intact.
     
  5. eatmorechicken

    eatmorechicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So you would eat them. But when would you butcher, and is caponizing a likely option to let them get bigger but remain tender? Or does really matter to caponize at all?
     
  6. eatmorechicken

    eatmorechicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This is a good question for everyone hatching chicks, it usually results in more cockerels than a person can keep. At first I would sell the extras for $5 apiece, then when my buyers spoke so highly of home-grown meat, it made me want to learn how to process them for myself. After I learned to process, I could keep the cockerels until they were about 20-24 weeks of age, and bring them to the table then. They are not at all tough at that age.

    Recently I learned how to caponize, and have begun doing that to the cockerel chicks. It's not really that difficult to learn, and there's information on this forum & other places online to get instructions. I think I will continue to do this when time allows, otherwise I'll let them grow out intact

    Ha! you answered my question before I could post it... your a quick typer sunnysideup. However, I believe that cockerels do get tough after about 15 weeks. They are definitely a different texture compared to store bought chicken. The leg meat especially will get tough and stringy. But they do taste much better than store bought chicken​
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2010
  7. Muscovies

    Muscovies Chillin' With My Peeps

    I would sell the extra's and slim it down to the one you want to keep.

    Hope this helps
     
  8. HorizonSon

    HorizonSon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Any roos not being kept for breeding, feeding and protecting the flock are processed for family consumption [​IMG]
     
  9. RainbowBirds_of_a_Feather

    RainbowBirds_of_a_Feather Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aloha,

    I would eat them and or sell them to people to be eaten. Asians will buy them, trust me, I know because they always want to buy my "native chickens". Mind you they are just feral chickens that are caught and grown. They will even buy eggs from me as well. But butchering your own birds are better and saves you money at the grocery store seeing that you are putting so much into the hatching and feeding of your birds. As the saying goes:


    I fed yah, now you going to feed me!
     
  10. Raven81

    Raven81 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    i would try sell / give them away at a youngish age if that didnt happen i would eat them.
     

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