Whats the best way to keep extra Roosters?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by philintheblank, May 15, 2011.

  1. philintheblank

    philintheblank Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 27, 2011
    Edmonton
    I am replacing my flock this spring but the hatcheries i have in the area require me to order at least 10 of each breed, i am looking at getting
    barred rocks and RIR's, and they only come unsexed. last year out of 23 chicks straight run i ended up with 14 roosters that i ended up giving away becasue i wasnt
    prepare for them and they started gettin rough. this year i dont really want to do that seeing as i am paying for them and feeding them until i figure out that
    they are indeed roosters, so i would like to keep them till sluaghter weight and then have some fresh chicken in the freezer. so as you all know roos like to fight and
    with possible a dozen roos or more, what is the best way to keep these guys from ripping eachother up?

    the main purpose is to get hens, but the roosters will have their use to if i can keep them till they make weight.
    the cost efficency is not really a concern at this stage either, i am still new to chickens and dont expect to be making/saving
    money in any stage at this point.
     
  2. Moabite

    Moabite Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 24, 2010
    Utah
    I'm a bit lazy, so I'd just find a place that sells sexed poultry and avoid roosters all together, except maybe one or two. How many coops do you have?
     
  3. philintheblank

    philintheblank Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 27, 2011
    Edmonton
    Just one big one, but i have a buddy that has a farm near where i work, so i was thinking about setting something up there if he will let me.
     
  4. Micklemoose

    Micklemoose Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 6, 2011
    I suggest you look into caponizing them if this is a recurring situation you will have. From everything I have read (haven't done it myself), it is not particularly difficult if you practice first on recently slaughtered birds (practicing on live ones seems pretty cruel), and when done correctly is quite painless.
     

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