whats the difference........

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by ameraucanacrazy, Mar 27, 2009.

  1. ameraucanacrazy

    ameraucanacrazy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    what isthe difference between hatchery stock and show quality i would like to know and can u make a sq out ofa hatchery stock
     
  2. Mahonri

    Mahonri Urban Desert Chicken Enthusiast Premium Member

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    Hatchery stock usually comes from breeders who aren't too concerned about show quality appearance. There are exceptions and I've seen some beautiful birds come from hatcheries but that is the exception and not the rule.

    Show Quality birds usually come from breeders who show their birds.
     
  3. ameraucanacrazy

    ameraucanacrazy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    and dose any one have or now of a bantam cochins in ga blue and splash
     
  4. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    The exact definition of show stock or show quality is rather hard to pen down. A bird that does very well at a smaller show may fare poorly in a larger show--or it may kick butt.

    Generally a SQ bird is one with absolutely no DQs and few faults. It comes very close to the Standard of Perfection for its breed and its variety.

    Hatchery birds usually fall far short of the standard. DQs are common and faults are more so. You'll find incorrect skin/leg colour, incorrect or poorly shaped combs, size tends to be small for large fowl and large for bantams, patterns are less defined, type (shape and stance of the bird) is usually not quite right.

    Yes, you can work to breed SQ from hatchery birds, but it will usually take years--far better to spend a bit more money to get good birds to start with rather than re-inventing the wheel. For most breeds you can get a descent bird without too great an expense.
     
  5. BorderKelpie

    BorderKelpie Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 1, 2009
    outside Dallas
    Ok, maybe this is a bad analogy, but are hatcheries the 'puppy mills' of the chicken world? (I hope not, I just ordered for the first time from one).
    What about the hatcheries advertising discounts for children's projects(4-H and FFA?) can they show the hatchery chicks competitively?
     
  6. Black Feather

    Black Feather Chillin' With My Peeps

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  7. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Yes & no to the puppy mill question. The vast majority of folks who have chickens could care less about showing them or whether or not they meet a standard. They want eggs, and/or meat, and/or yard candy.

    Hatchery stock meets the first two very, very well and also meets the last fairly well.

    If you purchase hatchery stock for exhibition you will not fare well in competition. However some 4H programs raise meat birds, and all birds must be ordered simultaneously from the same hatchery, which levels the playing field--differences in the birds are based upon the specific care they receive, not who was able to acquire better birds.
     
  8. amazondoc

    amazondoc Cracked Egghead

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    Quote:Sort of.

    Both puppy mills and hatcheries care more about production than about quality. HOWEVER, chickens are not dogs! There are no shelters filled with millions of unwanted chickens -- and chickens have physical and behavioral needs that are much more simple and less demanding than dogs. So it's a different situation.

    I do doberman rescue. I've done rescue of one sort or another literally all my life. Nonetheless, I just got an order of babies from Ideal this past Wednesday. I would rather have ordered from breeders -- and I HAVE ordered other birds from breeders -- but these particular birds are ones that I couldn't get elsewhere without a LOT of trouble.

    Anyway -- IMHO it is usually better to get birds from breeders than from hatcheries. But if you know exactly what you're getting in terms of quality, and if you've checked out all the alternatives, I don't think it's **evil** to give the hatchery your business.

    I hope this helps!
     
  9. Solsken Farm

    Solsken Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Sort of.

    Both puppy mills and hatcheries care more about production than about quality. HOWEVER, chickens are not dogs! There are no shelters filled with millions of unwanted chickens -- and chickens have physical and behavioral needs that are much more simple and less demanding than dogs. So it's a different situation.

    I do doberman rescue. I've done rescue of one sort or another literally all my life. Nonetheless, I just got an order of babies from Ideal this past Wednesday. I would rather have ordered from breeders -- and I HAVE ordered other birds from breeders -- but these particular birds are ones that I couldn't get elsewhere without a LOT of trouble.

    Anyway -- IMHO it is usually better to get birds from breeders than from hatcheries. But if you know exactly what you're getting in terms of quality, and if you've checked out all the alternatives, I don't think it's **evil** to give the hatchery your business.

    I hope this helps!

    My sentiments exactly.
     
  10. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Very well stated. Hatcheries fit a different want/need than breeders. You could compare it to purchasing your clothes from a discount department store, from a high end department store or from a designer. In any of those cases you get functional clothing; but the quality and precision will usually differ.

    If you're looking for clothes to clean out the barn, scrub toilets & floors, do yardwork, etc. you're looking for a different type of functionality & quality than if you're looking to make the red-carpet news at the Oscars or shine on your wedding day.
     

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