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What's the point in quarantineing new birds?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by elizabet253, Feb 1, 2015.

  1. elizabet253

    elizabet253 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If they look healthy, what is the point? You lock them up for 30 days and they still act the same. How are you suppose to know they have any dieases if they don't show signs of it? Or are you suppose to put a tester chicken in with the quarantine chickens to see if they do in fact carry something?
     
  2. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    Most infectious diseases will express themselves far before the 30 day period is up. True some birds may be carriers that have recovered from disease, but that is the chance we take whenever adding birds to our flock. Quarantine is not putting birds in an adjacent pen separated by wire. It involves housing birds in separate quarters preferably downwind, feeding them last , using designated clothing/boots. Quarantine is not a 100% guarantee, but it is better than nothing. Buying from NPIP breeders greatly increases your chances of getting healthy birds. Buying from auctions or jobbers on the other hand--------------
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. cavemanrich

    cavemanrich Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sourland puts it like it is. Quarantine is also not possible for all chicken owners. You need separate facilities. Not many of us with small flocks have. I would guess that taking in new chickens is a gamble that so many of us take. I myself included. I have small flock, so it would not be a devastation. It certainly would be a SAD LOSS .. If you have a large flock, that is for more than personal use, yes ,you are advised to take precautions. Many people seem to be afraid of their own shadow. I think when you are like that, you are robbing yourself of happiness. You can have a disease arrive at your coop, from stuff you purchased at the feed store. There are countless scenarios. WISHING YOU BEST WITH YOUR FLOCK.
    [​IMG]
     
  4. Suzie

    Suzie Overrun With Chickens

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    Sourland..

    Correct me if I am wrong...

    Your post makes so much sense...it is OUR responsibility to ensure that we do all that we can to protect our flocks and eradicate any potential problem before it affects our other fowl...

    In my thoughts..it is better to cull a few new potential flockmates than to introduce havoc with a disease that will destroy ALL of my flock...quarantine is so essential to me for at least 4 weeks before I will contemplate integrating any new arrivals to my beloved existing flocks...I owe it to them.
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    Suzie, it is all about the responsibility to the flock that depends upon us in many ways.
     
  6. elizabet253

    elizabet253 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well, I've been quartieing a few birds right now seperate from my birds, the rooster has been stalking them outside of their pen so he is now hanging out with the girls. He's a teenage rooster with cougar hens so he is happy. So should I just now look for signs of him catching anything until bringing them all back into the flock? How long do I wait? Also, how do I introduce them to the other birds? I can't really use a fence method because my birds fly, but I'm surprised the rooster didn't even get attacked by the hens when he pranced his way over to them. He's been oddly dancing for them actually.
     
  7. Suzie

    Suzie Overrun With Chickens

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    As Sourland says...quarantine is our best defence....please take heed of his wonderful advice....give it the four weeks..otherwise you risk losing all of your flock(s)
     
  8. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens


    I agree 100%. It's just not worth finding out you've brought home some nasty bug to a previously healthy flock.

    In this case, if the only "quarantine" going on for these birds is a fence and the rooster is going back and forth between the fenced off new birds and the rest of the flock then quarantine does not exist at this point any way.
     
  9. elizabet253

    elizabet253 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well that rooster is now my tester bird, he volenteered himself. So we'll see if he gets sick or not.
     
  10. chicknmania

    chicknmania Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    You are saving yourself a lot of potential heartache, work, and worry, by quarantining new birds. Also, the new birds appreciate it. How would you like to be jerked out of what you thought was your happy home, carted away, and dumped amongst a bunch of unfriendly strangers? Quarantining, in addition to helping to prevent the spread of horrible things, also allows your new birds to settle down and get used to you and their new environment.
     

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