what's wrong with her comb/wattle?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by FatChicksDigMe, Nov 8, 2015.

  1. FatChicksDigMe

    FatChicksDigMe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hello guys, I pray you are all doing well and your flocks are thriving;)

    My hen, Mary Poopins is acting normal, but its been perhaps a week since she is developing yellow sores on her wattle...She is one of the most nicest chickens in my flock and on the point of lay. Is this a disease I should be worried about!? Thank you!
    [​IMG]
     
  2. slaw123456

    slaw123456 Out Of The Brooder

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    Description

    The fowl pox virus infects birds, including chickens. It spreads through infected birds, contaminated equipment and biting insects, such as mosquitoes. Called fowl pox for good reason, it causes white, then yellow, and then finally brown spots on the bird's comb, wattles, legs, mouth and anywhere there are no feathers. Fowl pox will cause the bird's egg-laying to stop or be severely reduced, and it will hurt growth.
    Types

    Fowl pox has two types: dry pox and wet pox. The dry pox invades the comb, face and legs; the wet type will attack the mouth, windpipe and throat. Birds die from suffocation if they have the wet type of fowl pox. Dry pox seldom causes death.
    Prevalence and Transmission

    Fowl pox is found all over the world and has existed in chickens since ancient times. A bird becomes infected through a scratch. Birds that survive fowl pox are carriers and can transmit the disease to new birds through scratches or biting flies, lice, mites and mosquitoes. Birds once infected with fowl pox that recovered can show symptoms when under stress. Wild birds can transmit the disease to chickens through insects.
    Treatment

    Although there is no effective treatment for fowl pox, you can vaccinate those birds who do not show symptoms with a fowl pox vaccination for adult birds. This should slow or stop the disease from spreading. To treat and prevent bacterial infections that arise with the virus, for three days you should add 1 tablespoon of powdered Terramycin per gallon to your birds' water. Putting a mix of sulfur power and petroleum jelly (2 teaspoons sulfur per 1 cup petroleum jelly) on the birds' lesions and scabs will soothe the affected areas and keep the parasites away.
    Prevention

    Preventing fowl pox is a matter of good poultry management. Vaccinate all your chicks with fowl pox vaccination intended for chicks. Keep all equipment clean. Reducing or eliminating external parasites and putting up mosquito netting will keep mosquitoes out of your coop.

    cited from: http://animals.mom.me/chicken-comb-spot-disease-2116.html
     
  3. FatChicksDigMe

    FatChicksDigMe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you-most of my flock is OK so far, but I did see this on my silkie rooster and RIR hen.

    Mary (the hen in question) is actually sitting in the nest box right now and expecting her first egg...are her eggs safe?
     
  4. slaw123456

    slaw123456 Out Of The Brooder

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    it doesn't effect the stomach but i wouldn't eat them just in case
     
  5. FatChicksDigMe

    FatChicksDigMe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    OK! Thank you for everything
     
  6. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    I have never seen anything in the many links I have read saying that there is anything wrong with eating the eggs. Laying can temporarily slow down during a pox infection, but will become normal again in a couple of weeks when the virus is gone. Here are a couple more links about pox with pictures:
    http://www.thepoultrysite.com/publications/6/diseases-of-poultry/195/fowl-pox/
    http://www.michigan.gov/dnr/0,1607,7-153-10370_12150_12220-26362--,00.html
    http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2015/07/fowl-pox-prevention-treatment.html
     
  7. FatChicksDigMe

    FatChicksDigMe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Update: it looks very ugly still... Should I do anything about it and will she look normal again: ([​IMG]
     
  8. Free Feather

    Free Feather Chillin' With My Peeps

    You should definitely do something about it as it will spread.
     
  9. Suzie

    Suzie Overrun With Chickens

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    Take heed of what eggcessive has posted about this virus...she has amazing knowledge about chickens...maybe re read what she has sent in the links to you...fowl pox takes some time to heal...
     
  10. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    You can apply iodine to help dry up the scabs, but don't disturb them since it can spread the pox virus. It should all clear up after the virus is gone. Secondary infections could cause some scarring I suppose. If she has any pox near the eyes, it may be wise to apply some Vetericyn eye gel or eye wash, or Terramycin eye ointment to the eyes.
     

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