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When do chickens start slowing down for the winter?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Tiana Rose, Feb 18, 2016.

  1. Tiana Rose

    Tiana Rose Out Of The Brooder

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    I have looked all over and cannot seem to find anything about this. So I am getting ready to get baby chicks. From what I read they will start laying in 4-6 months. So that will be July to September. But when do they slow down for winter? October? November? So they will only have a few months of good laying and then I will only get a few eggs a week, if at all? The five breeds I am getting are Buff Orpingtons, Black Australorp, Silver Laced Wyandotte, Barred Plymouth Rock, and Speckled Sussex. I tried to pick hardy, less noisy, friendly breeds that seem to have the possibility of longevity as I live in the city and cannot replace to often and I get way to attached to just turn one of my girls into stew. So, with that in mind, I would rather they ease off in the winter with just a few eggs a week rather than power house through and finish at two. However, I still do not know when they start easing off. It seems to have something to do with light but no idea what month that magic number seems to trigger. I live in eastern Washington. Thanks for any help.
     
  2. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    [​IMG] Frequently first year pullets will lay through their first winter.
     
  3. N F C

    N F C Home in WY Premium Member

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    Sourland is right (he usually is!), a lot of young pullets will continue to lay through their first winter. After that is when they typically slow down during winter (shorter daylight hours).

    This table for determining duration of daylight hours might help you (just enter in your state and city):
    http://aa.usno.navy.mil/data/docs/Dur_OneYear.php
    You can see how there are fewer hours of daylight in certain months and get an idea of when the slow down will probably occur.

    Hope that helps.
     
  4. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    Can I quote you on this?
     
  5. CTKen

    CTKen Monkey business Premium Member

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    Sour - i reckon Debby's been at the cooking sherry again - she's not herself today it seems! [​IMG]

    CT
     
  6. Tiana Rose

    Tiana Rose Out Of The Brooder

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    Oh, that is interesting. Thank you.
     
  7. N F C

    N F C Home in WY Premium Member

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    Of course you may. Although, I'm sure the Princess already knows it (even if she wouldn't say so.


    Nope, never sherry. Something with rum in it or a margarita maybe, sometimes a mimosa or wine...but never sherry.

    See @Tiana Rose , this is what happens when you hang out here...you make wonderful friends like these guys! [​IMG]
     
  8. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Runs With Chickens Premium Member

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    Your birds should lay through the first winter but might slow down a bit, they might lay 1-2 eggs a week as opposed to 5-6. They will pick up again in early spring, laying like crazy until the heat of summer slows them down again, picking up in fall for a bit, than quitting to molt. After the molt they should resume again. Most take 2-6 months off to molt and recover physically, time off depends on whether they are good or poor layers. Repeat every year until they stop one day and either give you a sporadic egg or none at all. Most stop between 4-8 years old.
     
  9. Tiana Rose

    Tiana Rose Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 17, 2016
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    Thank you! That is a very detailed answer, and very helpful.

    @NorthFLChick That is one of the things I like about this site. I might not have posted often, but I have been a lurker for a while. lol
     

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