When do hens willingly squat for roos?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by AJ666, Nov 17, 2010.

  1. AJ666

    AJ666 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think my roo is alot more mature then my pullets. They never squat willingly. They are five months old. Of my six girls, only two will let him mount them, and they go down kicking and screaming until they give up, he never does. When do they stop the squalling and actually accept his attempts?
     
  2. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Quote:Shortly before starting to lay. In the past week I've had 6 of my layer pullets and all of my CX pullets start squatting for my cockerel, whereas before they all screamed. They are 5 1/2 months old. It's alot more peaceful around here.
     
  3. Chicken.Lytle

    Chicken.Lytle Chillin' With My Peeps

    My hens refused to cooperate until they were nearly ready to lay eggs. The cockerel had a bit of a learning curve too.

    For a while everything was fine. He would do his "Hey baby" dance and mount the hens regularly. But recently he is off his game. He went from studly to hapless in just a month. Is this a seasonal thing?
     
  4. bakerjw

    bakerjw Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have 8 girls that think that I am the roo. I go into the run and they all start squatting down and stomping their feet. It is too cute. Until they start running around my feet and do it to get my attention. And you thought that cats were bad.
     
  5. Sweet Violet

    Sweet Violet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    after the second date. [​IMG]
     
  6. pgpoultry

    pgpoultry Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My hens vary.
    Two welcome ANY advance from any roo., and another pair have their favourite 'man'. The rest are relatively co-operative, but one hybrid (aged nearly 4) resists any advances.
     
  7. Domestic_goddess

    Domestic_goddess Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Squating is the biggest all tell sign for me that they will lay soon. Usually about 6-7 months, depends on the breed though. EE's take much longer, like 8-9 months.
     
  8. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Chicken.Lytle :

    My hens refused to cooperate until they were nearly ready to lay eggs. The cockerel had a bit of a learning curve too.

    For a while everything was fine. He would do his "Hey baby" dance and mount the hens regularly. But recently he is off his game. He went from studly to hapless in just a month. Is this a seasonal thing?

    Some roos are just not as pushy about mating as others. My adult roo was just as annoying as any other cockerel when he was young, but as he's matured he doesn't force himself on a hen that's not interested at the time. Also, he doesn't try to mate when he's not feeling well or molting, so keep an eye out for signs of illness or molting.​
     
  9. dsqard

    dsqard Crazy "L" Farms

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    I have a much more mature roo to my pullets. He tried mating with them starting around 5 months or so but I don't think he got very far and was a gentleman about it. Now that they are starting to lay (six month old pullets and eight to nine month old pullets) they are allowing him to mount them without a hassle. In fact I saw one of my SLW run up to him for mating. I believe she is the one that started laying yesterday. Can't wait until she is past the pullet egg stage so I can hatch out some EE's!
     
  10. gryeyes

    gryeyes Covered in Pet Hair & Feathers

    Mature hens with high status will squat for a roo when they darned well feel like it.

    Pullets, however, will squat once they get close to laying eggs, and also when they feel the need to be submissive to a roo. (Such as when he approaches with that gleam in his eye and the Rooster Dance of Love in his step, one wing down and circling.) Up until then, they just scream like school girls and run away.
     

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