When does a breeder become a hatchery?

Discussion in 'Chicken Breeders & Hatcheries' started by Solsken Farm, Nov 20, 2008.

  1. Solsken Farm

    Solsken Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

    I think of a breeder as someone who specializes in a small number of breeds to create quality stock and eggs. When do they fall into the hatchery status? When a breeder sells over 30 types, are they really able to maintain high quality and would they still be considered a breeder?

    I want to make it clear that I have NO intention of having more than 30 types. LOL I am thinking 5-7.....
     
  2. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    There are a lot of legalities, permits, federal and state codes, inspections, certifications, etc to be a legitimate hatchery. There are big ones like (McMurray) and small ones (like Catalpa Grove).

    Then there are the little farm/home operations calling themselves hatcheries without proper ceertifications and licenses will find out the hard way They are breaking the laws. to me these are like chick mills (same as a puppy mill). Simply churning out chicks and trying to make money on their little lives.

    Breeders to me are those who select a few breeds and work tirelessly to improve and maintain a breed. they diligently work close with their stock and try their best to represent the breed as best as possible.
     
  3. onthespot

    onthespot Deluxe Dozens

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    some legit hatcheries also produce very high quality birds in some varietes. Some strive for quality and try to get as close to the breed standard as possible, and some just get by and pay bills by whatever means possible with the stock they have.

    Some "breeders" including people who win at the national level breed birds and ignore known genetic faults that negatively affect the health of the birds for generations to come, just so they can win. They pull wrong colored feathers, or wait until they feather out even with the slow feathering gene so they can show them and no one will know. Some shape beaks and combs (aside from accepted dubbing) and what have you. You name it. If it can be done, someone is doing it. Not all, but more than would care to admit it in public if the truth be told.

    So the size of an opperation is not a good way to judge the birds, eggs or the integrity of the breeder. The quality of their eggs and how closely their birds match the standard for their breed/variety, as well as overall health, genetic soundness, disposition and plain ol' eye appeal is what makes a good breeder, no matter how many you are breeding.
     
  4. geareduplyn

    geareduplyn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am going to become a Backyard Hatchery this coming spring, and am in the procees of getting the necessary certification. I am primarily an Araucana breeder, but I also have birds in four other breeds that are selected for their conformity to the Standard of Perfection. Chick Mills MissPrissy?
     
  5. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Yes, chick mills. There are a couple places near me that hatch all sorts of chicks. One of the places has a stench that could cloud the air green. These people hatch hatch hatch. Sell chicks for a couple dollars and never take responsibilty for them. One of them always has sick animals with scours, conjunctivitis and other issues. It is very sad. It is all about making a dollar. I questioned the need for the vet I use to check some animals but the person didn't think they needed medical treatment. Think - eyes crusted closed.
     
  6. Quail_Antwerp

    Quail_Antwerp [IMG]emojione/assets/png/2665.png?v=2.2.7[/IMG]Mrs

    Aug 16, 2008
    Ohio
    Interesting thread.

    I never thought of people using chickens to make a quick $1 like they do with puppy mills. Thank you Miss Prissy for letting us know that this does happen. It's a shame.
     
  7. geareduplyn

    geareduplyn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    MissPrissy there is the Humane Society. Perhaps in this case a call would be OK. I don't think that any chicken facility could compare to horrendousness of a Puppy Mill. The Amish BTW are the wost offenders.
     
  8. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Animals move in and out and get taken to the weekly auctions. I know people who have reported them and it is trying to catch them with the sick animals and such that is the hard part.
     
  9. cjeanean

    cjeanean Can't Decide

    Mar 5, 2008
    Missouri
    When I got my NPIP certification I was told that I was now considered an independent private hatchery. I can sell both eggs and chicks, and I plan to for the purpose of making money to pay for feed for my flock. Now, I'm definately not going to be into hatching constantly, I don't have the room or facilities for that. So is what I plan to do also considered wrong? (I'm not arguing, I'm wanting to understand what you all consider a right or wrong way of selling eggs/chicks....)
     
  10. pips&peeps

    pips&peeps There is no "I" in Ameraucana

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    Quote:From my information, you are not a hatchery with NPIP unless you can meet all the guidelines for a hatchery.

    If you sell day old chicks, you must have a seperate room for your incubator and hatcher. There must be a room for storing and disinfecting eggs. There cannot be any storage in these rooms the only thing that can occupy them are the eggs, incubator or hatcher.

    Your hatched chicks must be moved to a seperate room also. You must clean your incubator after every hatch, thus preventing staggered hatching.

    There are lots of regulations.
     

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