when is too late in the season for chickens to start sitting on eggs

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by barg, May 14, 2007.

  1. barg

    barg Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 27, 2007
    when is too late in the season for chickens to start sitting on eggs to hatch in the Pacific North West area.
     
  2. jimnjay

    jimnjay Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 11, 2007
    Bryant Alabama
    You want your birds to be around 3 months old when the cold weather hits. Some people let their hens set all year long. The hen will care for the babies in all kinds of weather. I prefer to let them concentrate on taking care of themselves during the cold.
     
  3. Keisha

    Keisha Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 27, 2007
    Iowa
    If she answered your question, then ignore me. But did you mean, when is it too late for a chicken to start going broody? Because if so, I've been wondering the same thing with my chickens. They've been laying for a while but they will not touch them at all. So i dont have the answer to that question, I was just rephrasing it so It makes better sense. But if that wasnt' your questioin, than again just ignore me. [​IMG]
     
  4. barg

    barg Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 27, 2007
    My question is simple yet complex [​IMG] .
    Im looking at contingency in case one of my dominiques is a boy.
    I'm trying to figure out if i can get chicks out of the 2 before it gets too cold in the pacific North west (mild winters here)and before my neighbors realise I have a rooster and i get reported :eek:
    Of coarse the proof that one is a rooster is still not in, but several people seem to think its likely.

    So, my chicks are 1 month old, what are the chances I could get a new generation in 5 months.
    And when they say dominiques "mature young" does that mean they lay young, produce chicks young....

    That pretty much sums it up.

    Thanks for your input
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2007
  5. mlheran

    mlheran Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Not very likely. Everything I've read said you shouldn't let young pullets set, and if they do the eggs are usually of very poor quality with low hatchability. They're just too young to do things right. Sorry. [​IMG]
     
  6. Oaknim

    Oaknim Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 25, 2007
    Sylvia, KS
    One of my Australorps (Gigi, we call her) hatched a baby in the dead of winter. She was also sitting on our Americauna's eggs, but they didn't hatch. They developed and one even pipped, but they died shortly afterwards or something. So she only had one baby. The Americauna eggs were from pullets that weren't a year old, so I'm thinking that's the reason for a failed hatch. My Australorp hens are all 8 years old, so I'm surprised she got one of her own eggs to hatch!

    Not to bring you down or anything, but all books that I've read say that chickens have the best hatchability rate right around 18 months to two years of age and for awhile thereafter. But don't quote me on that, I'm going by memory and I'm not the sharpest person... ~ Oaknim
     
  7. barg

    barg Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 27, 2007
    Well if hazel does turn out to be a roo (hopefully not!), I guess ill have to find another way to get a new dominique. Maybe i'll get an egg when nikki gets older.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    These were taken about 5 minutes ago [​IMG]
     
  8. jimnjay

    jimnjay Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Are your two from the same parents? If so, I would look for a different source for your second hen anyway. You can breed Sister and Brother but it really is not a great idea. I guess if you are looking for layers only it probably will not make a difference.
    Many people set pullet eggs. It is not the best practice but very common and there are many very healthy beautiful chickens out there from such eggs. If you are breeding for the best quality show stock you would be more selective on the eggs you set. Your Dominique may not be an obsessive broody, however. She may wait till spring to set. Now if it was a Silkie you could probably count on her going broody. If you want two Dominique layers then I would be on the look out for a second one. I am not good at sexing but on my single comb breeds you can see distinct redness on the comb by 8 weeks. Once you know for sure then you would probably be best off to find a friend for your little pullet to keep her company and share body warmth for the winter.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2007
  9. barg

    barg Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 27, 2007
    Quote:No idea, they were selected from a box of 50 chicks, chances are theyt were not from the same parents, but they could be
    Once you know for sure then you would probably be best off to find a friend for your little pullet to keep her company and share body warmth for the winter.

    She will still be with the 2 australorps even if hazel is a male.
    Ide like to get a 2nd dominique if hazel is a roo , i'm just worried about introduceing a new chicken to the flock. Our city ordinance says we can have 4 chickens maximum, and ive read you should get new chickens in two's, that would be 5 and we cant have that. So i figured if it was the chick of one of established hens, it would integrate better.​
     
  10. mandolinmama

    mandolinmama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 13, 2007
    Urbana Missouri
    I have done some reading on this and found that they'll hatch out eggs year round. One way to sort of trick them into going broody is to add extra light durring short day seasons - it makes them think it's spring again.
     

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