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When should i give them grit??

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by shell25, Sep 20, 2010.

  1. shell25

    shell25 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 18, 2010
    Derbyshire
    What age should i start to give grit my chickens are 9 week old and i visited the local store that sells all what i need for them and they said they only do mixed grit, is the right grit and to leave it another 2-3 weeks before i give it to them, is this right?

    Thanks
     
  2. Imp

    Imp All things share the same breath- Chief Seattle

    Quote:You would need to start giving them grit when they start eating food other than their starter food. ie treats or they are free ranging and getting bugs, weeds etc.
    I've not heard the phrase "mixed" grit What does that mean? If it means there is a mix of sizes that is good. If it means other things are mixed in, then can you post ingredients? Grit is usually just crushed stone.

    Imp
     
  3. shell25

    shell25 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 18, 2010
    Derbyshire
    Hiya thankyou, im not sure what it means to be honest i will find out more when i next visit. They are free ranging some times of the day and i told my local supplier that and they said they will be picking the odd bit of grit up from the garden??

    Im new to chicken these are my first lot and ive had them only 4 days..

    Michelle
     
  4. rebelcowboysnb

    rebelcowboysnb Confederate Money Farm Premium Member

    If they can get to the ground ya dont need it.
     
  5. Imp

    Imp All things share the same breath- Chief Seattle

    Quote:
    they said they will be picking the odd bit of grit up from the garden

    Thank you rebelcowboy,

    This is true, you do not need grit if they are free ranged on rocky ground, they will pick it up and store it in their gizzard.

    Imp- should know to not post before the first cuppa joe. [​IMG]
     
  6. shell25

    shell25 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 18, 2010
    Derbyshire
    Thanks the bit where they roam is mainly grass and soil?
     
  7. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Imp, have another cup. That information came out after you posted. [​IMG]

    They should be OK. If the soil is pure clay like swamp muck where there are absolutely no bits of rock or sand in it, then they migth need some extra grit, but most of us don't keep chickens in those areas.
     
  8. shell25

    shell25 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    99
    Sep 18, 2010
    Derbyshire
    Quote:You would need to start giving them grit when they start eating food other than their starter food. ie treats or they are free ranging and getting bugs, weeds etc.
    I've not heard the phrase "mixed" grit What does that mean? If it means there is a mix of sizes that is good. If it means other things are mixed in, then can you post ingredients? Grit is usually just crushed stone.

    Imp

    Apparanlt mixed grit is normal grit and shell grit (the lady whose there today is not very helpful 1 bit)
     
  9. shell25

    shell25 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 18, 2010
    Derbyshire
    Quote:Oh no its nothing like that just a normal garden really some grass areas, some soil arears the odd tree & bush [​IMG]
     
  10. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Shell grit sounds like ground oyster shell to me, which is not grit. Oyster shell is too soft to be used as grit but also the chicken's digestive system has acid in it, just like ours. The acid disolves the oyster shell pretty quickly. As Imp said, even without his coffee, check the ingredients on the bag. If it says oyster shell or if there is a lot of calcium in it, it is not grit. Grit that is sold in the store is usually granite, which is very hard and inert.

    I personally don't think you need to buy grit. They should do OK with what is in the ground. Grit is pretty cheap and it won't hurt anything to offer it, but what I usually do if I need grit for my chicks in a brooder is go to my gravel road or driveway and collect some sand and small stones. If they use salt in the winter for ice, that is not a good idea since they cannot handle the extra salt.
     

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