when should you stop incubating for the winter?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by nicoletm24, Sep 12, 2010.

  1. nicoletm24

    nicoletm24 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 11, 2010
    Timberlake
    is it bad to have hatches while its so cold? since the babies would get MUCH colder if in an outside brooder. I might do one more hatch after this one thats due in a couple weeks. but worried about anymore, since there will be snow come january.


    any tips would be great!
     
  2. jerseygirl1

    jerseygirl1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 20, 2009
    Orange County, NY
    I stopped in May due to the humidity issues here, and will probably start again in December - I had better hatch rates in February and March than any other time of year
     
  3. bargain

    bargain Love God, Hubby & farm Premium Member

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    Apr 13, 2008
    Bowdon, GA
    I don't stop! Last winter we had snow and babies and it worked out fine. I just have to remember to keep the humidity up as usually winter air is a little drier but not too much in our house as we only heat one room! Have a blessed one. Nancy
     
  4. nicoletm24

    nicoletm24 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:good to hear! then i'll keep it up as long as i feel comfy with it! THANKS
     
  5. SkyWarrior

    SkyWarrior Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 2, 2010
    Wilds of Montana
    On this note -- how do you keep the babies warm in the brooder when it gets really cold? Certainly you all don't take them inside the house?
     
  6. bigdawg

    bigdawg AA Poultry

    Jun 28, 2009
    middle tenn
    who stops. my silkies go broody year round. hatched seven last year and it was snowing. just build a nice plywood box brooder, ventilate the end farthest from the heat lamp and watch the babys grow. build the box as big as you can so you can have a divider that you can extend the box as they grow. once they have feathered good move them to a draft free coop and hang them a heat lamp in case they need it. thats what i do. hatch in nov, dec sell laying pullets in the spring and eat the roosters.........
     
  7. gryeyes

    gryeyes Covered in Pet Hair & Feathers

    I bought my first 3-day old chicks in OCTOBER, last year, and brooded them in the house until some were 12 weeks old (because I bought a few after the first, and then some more, until I had some 4 weeks younger than the originals) before I put them outside. With a heat lamp in the coop.....

    So I don't think I'm gonna stop because now that I've started incubating eggs (instead of buying chicks) I don't think I CAN stop.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. muddstopper

    muddstopper Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Murphy NC
    Quote:I built a wooden brooder box and installed a wafer thermostat. The box has a lid in which I mounted a heat lamp. When the temp gets to low, the thermostat turns on the heat lamp. It cycles pretty much like a incubator or hatcher, in fact by adding a fan and a pan of water, I have hatched eggs in it.
     
  9. bargain

    bargain Love God, Hubby & farm Premium Member

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    Quote:Wheee....we're related! don't stop you're just getting cranked up. Baby chicks make great Christmas gifts, fathers dday, independence day, etc! [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  10. Surehatch

    Surehatch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Glad to see everyone still incubating eggs!
     

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