When to coat waddles & combs

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by NJbirdlover, Nov 4, 2009.

  1. NJbirdlover

    NJbirdlover Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have heard that when it gets real cold you can coat your chickens combs with vaseline to help prevent frostbite. At what temp would be a good time for this and does it actually work?
     
  2. faykokoWV

    faykokoWV Mrs Fancy Plants

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    I hope someone answers as I have been wondering this too. My guess would be if there is an extended period of below freezing temperatures.
     
  3. ShaggysGirl

    ShaggysGirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 24, 2009
    Temperance, MI
    I'd like to know too, And also can Bag Balm be used instead of Vaseline?
     
  4. LynneP

    LynneP Chillin' With My Peeps

  5. faykokoWV

    faykokoWV Mrs Fancy Plants

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    so I've read the cold weather recommendations, I'm still not sure about when to apply vaseline/bag balm to the combs

    hopefully someone will respond with a recommendation.
     
  6. NJbirdlover

    NJbirdlover Chillin' With My Peeps

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    ok all of you chicken experts...we need an answer here!
     
  7. Mahlzeit

    Mahlzeit Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I haven't had to put any on for a couple of years now. I keep a close eye on the tips of the single combed hens and roosters and if I see them start to turn purple I put vaseline on them at night. It was real cold here last winter but I didn't have any problems.
     
  8. ella

    ella Chillin' With My Peeps

    I didn't have real good luck with vaseline. If it's cold enough they will freeze anyway. I have one rooster whose comb froze solid after I coated it with vaseline, way worse than it would have been without it. He was a youngster and it was -20 below windchill, it happened in 10 minutes. He was fine, just eventually lost the top of his comb. In my experience frostbite on the comb is a nusiance but it's not a real danger to their life/health.
     
  9. greathorse

    greathorse Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This procedure has never made the least little bit of sense to me. I agree that it may have the slightest effect on the tip of the comb on a very cold night. But lets think about this. Go outside on the coldest night with vaseline on your hands and just see how much more comfortable you are than you would be without vaseline.

    I dont get it quite frankly. Keep your coop ventilated but without draft and you should have no problems with frostbite in the coldest weather. If you are very concerned put a heat lamp in hte coop for nights that get sub zeroe F.

    that is my thought
     
  10. AkTomboy

    AkTomboy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 21, 2009
    DJ, Alaska
    So I have read this whole thing on here a million times and then had a new 4-H'r come ask me about it as she has moved up here from the lower 48. So I went and asked my old Chem / Bio teacher how to find out the freeze point of vaseline and how or if it could stop frost bite. Here is what he said....

    Freezing Point is depressed according to the following equation:

    FPD = FPD constant * molality

    Water's FPD constant is 1.86 degrees C per molality.

    Molality = number of moles of solute/kg of solvent.

    Freezing Point - FPD = the new freezing point.

    That said, I don't think that Vaseline prevents freezing that way. I think it protects the chicken by reflecting its own infrared radiation and since it has a very high coefficient of heat, it takes losing a lot of heat to drop the temperature of the Vaseline a degree Celsius. Also, the Vaseline would protect the chicken by preventing freezer burn by providing a coating that would not let water evaporate. As long as water cannot evaporate, it cannot get burned. It's like double wrapping freezer stuff. With that said it seems to me that it will only help to a very mind cold snap. And in some areas it could cause them to get frost bite faster. Hope it helps some


    Depending on where you are from I would start at freezing and go from there. Or watch the combs and waddles and when they start to change color put some on then. As for me I will just stay away from it as normal.
     

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