When to feed?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Nivrocco, Apr 9, 2009.

  1. Nivrocco

    Nivrocco Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 11, 2009
    S.W. VA
    My babies aren't due until 04/24, but I have a question or two. How long do you leave them in the incubator(after they have hatched) and when do you give them food and water? I know this has probably been answered somewhere, but I couldn't find it..Thanks. [​IMG]
     
  2. WNCUrbanAgrarian

    WNCUrbanAgrarian Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 28, 2009
    Western North Carolina
    Hi I can't answer this, but I have the same questions! I have 4 Sebastopols that have pipped, it's been less than 24 hours, and I am dying for them to come out so I can meet them!!! So, I hope someone answers you! Good Luck!!!

    Jody
    The Wanna Be Farmer
     
  3. Nivrocco

    Nivrocco Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 11, 2009
    S.W. VA
    Anybody out there? Please forgive my ignorance...but I really need to know..[​IMG]
     
  4. duck&chickencrazy

    duck&chickencrazy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 2, 2008
    Indiana
    well i have heard that you can leave them in there for up to 3 days...i would never leave them in that long though...you basically want to take them out when they are all hatched and somewhat fluffy....and you may have to show them the food but as soon as they see it they will know what to do...good luck [​IMG]
     
  5. OHMYCHICKIES

    OHMYCHICKIES Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 28, 2008
    good question, we're suppose to be hatching in 3 days, but maybe earlier cause they're rocking, I would love to know this..
     
  6. Guitartists

    Guitartists Resistance is futile

    Mar 21, 2008
    Michigan
    When dry and running around I move to a nice draft free brooder with heat lamp and take each one and dip the tips of their beaks into the water and the food so they know where to find it. They catch on quickly and once one figures it out, they tend to follow suit [​IMG]
     
  7. warmfuzzies

    warmfuzzies Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 15, 2009
    Boondocks, Colorado
    I think you are supposed to do it at about 24 hours, but not a lot sooner. I have read that you dont want them to eat too soon, since they are still digesting the yolk.

    Is this true, experts? Well, anyway, I have taken mine all out at about 24 hours. Some were a lot older, and they start getting to be a pain in the bator. [​IMG]
     
  8. Guitartists

    Guitartists Resistance is futile

    Mar 21, 2008
    Michigan
    You know... mine never really start eating until after another day or so.... but they do sometimes begin drinking water pretty soon after moving to the brooder.
     
  9. WNCUrbanAgrarian

    WNCUrbanAgrarian Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 28, 2009
    Western North Carolina
    Thank you WarmFuzzies, Guitarists, and OhMyChickies! I know that Karen will apprciate it too, when she gets up. I woke up at 3:30 to watch the second hatching. Sigh........ Oh so cute. Then of course the battery on my camera went out! Looks like so far I have 2 females, but then who knows cos the dad has saddleback genes.[​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  10. chilling in muscadine

    chilling in muscadine { I love being disfunctual }

    Jun 8, 2008
    muscadine, al.
    What you need to do is leave them in the bator until{without opening lid} all the chicks have hatched. They can survive three days in there without food or water. Of cource it never takes that long here at my house. Before the chick hatches it absorbes the yolk sack so this is what they live on. On rare cases, a chick will hatch with part of the yolk sack still attached, but leaving it in the bator is the best chance the chick has to fully absord the whole sack.

    Before removing the chick into a brooder you will want to make sure the chick is totally dry. Some people help show the chick where the food and water is but I have found they will find it on there on.

    One good thing and I always do this is I place marbles or small pebbles into the water so that it doesn't make the water to deep. You have to think about how weak a new chick is and they can easily fall in and drown or just plain get wet which isn't good for a baby chicken that has to remain warm. Something to think about and so easy to prevent. Hope this helps.
     

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