when to give treats and what is chick grit?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by mommy3, Sep 28, 2011.

  1. mommy3

    mommy3 Out Of The Brooder

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    Plantsville, CT
    Good Morning! I have been reading about treats for the chicks/chickens. I was wondering how early I can give them treats- I was thinking hard boiled eggs or grapes- do I cut up them up? one post said to put chick grit with it and was wondering if I should wait until they are two weeks old? . we are feeding them chick starter, is that the same as grit? They will be a week old on Friday/sat. I love watching them take turns with who stands on top of the feeder! I just changed to shavings in the brooder and put a couple sticks in for roosting- they are a little confused about it all! Also, should I still sprinkle food on the shavings for them to find? Have a great day everyone![​IMG]
     
  2. TinyChickenLady

    TinyChickenLady Chillin' With My Peeps

    I don't start grit until 2 weeks old. You're not SUPPOSED to feed them treats until they start grit but at one week old I will start giving them soft treats like chopped grapes or watermelon. And bread. They are fine with it. Then when you start the grit, you can give them crunchy treats too. At least that's how I've always done it.
     
  3. TinyChickenLady

    TinyChickenLady Chillin' With My Peeps

  4. fiddlebanshee

    fiddlebanshee Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I started them on chick grit right around day 4, at which time I started giving them treats. They seem to be doing fine. They do not have any pasty butt issues, the one chick that did have a little bit of that has since recovered. Their poops look perfectly normal, their crops are full and they are active and happy.

    The treats I've given so far are in order of popularity:
    mealworms
    stinkbugs
    happy hen treats (mixture of grains and dried veggies)
    mixed sprouts chopped to small pieces
    rabbitfoot clover (leaves and blossoms)
    rolled oats (uncooked)
    brussels sprouts leaves
    cooked oats with boiled egg mixed in (they didn't eat it).
     
  5. cmom

    cmom Hilltop Farm

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    My Coop
    My baby chicks are given free choice chick grit. Chick grit is fine Granite, as soon as they are given anything besides Starter Crumbles. Their tiny gizzards are at optimum function at an early age. I buy chick grit at my local Tractor Supply Co. store. If you have regular grit you can sift out the smaller pieces too. I have done that when I ran out of chick grit.
     
  6. galanie

    galanie Treat Dispenser No More

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    Sadly, in this day and age of carrying only what you sell the most of, a lot of places don't even have chick grit. If you can't find it, just use sand. Don't use grit for parrots or cage birds, it has calcium in there which can harm the chicks.
     
  7. al6517

    al6517 Real Men can Cook

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    I never rush to feed treats, I like to give them more time for their little systems to get adjusted better. I don't feed treats until they are totaly feathered out, sure you can feed treats earlier but I don't see the need or the urgency to at so young an age.
     
  8. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    I only feed grower until at least when they're out of the brooder, sometimes longer depending on the birds and their purpose.
    The grit is only needed if they have whole seeds or grains to grind up.
    Chick grit is just smaller than adult grit. Usually granite.

    ETAGrower is the result of tons of poultry nutrition research and anything else you add upsets that balance.
    That said, hand feeding mealworms will only add more protein (not a bad thing in growing bodies) and can tame the birds.
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2011
  9. GardenState38

    GardenState38 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I found chick grit difficult to find, but finally got it at a feed store.
    In the meantime, I kept a pan of sand in the brooder, which I'd recommend to anyone raising chicks.
    They LOVE to take dust baths in it and you'll see them eat a good amount of the sand--it seems a natural tendency for them. Just make sure to sift and change out the dirtied sand regularly (I've gone through 150 pounds of play sand in 10 weeks! Most of it has been added to my compost)
    My chicks have a free supply of sand and chick grit, and they get treated to a number of nutritious additions to their medicated crumble.
    Adding grit/sand and feeding a few wholesome "treats" such as plain yogurt, a few insects or dried mealworms, greens, fruits (watermelon, grapes, figs, etc.) is not much different than the varied diet they'd have if raised by a free-ranging hen.
    My chicks are happy, healthy, friendly and vibrant. They haven't experienced any crop problems or pasty butt, and still eat their crumble like pigs.
     
  10. fiddlebanshee

    fiddlebanshee Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Adding grit/sand and feeding a few wholesome "treats" such as plain yogurt, a few insects or dried mealworms, greens, fruits (watermelon, grapes, figs, etc.) is not much different than the varied diet they'd have if raised by a free-ranging hen.

    I agree with this. I do monitor that they are also eating their regular feed and the amounts of treats that I offer are small. e.g. 5 mealworms for 14 chicks, or a quarter cup of chopped up sprouts. One package sprouts from the supermarket will last about 6 to 8 treat-times.

    I also only treat twice a day, they do not have access to treats (apart from stinkbugs). Once in the morning before i leave for work I scatter some scratch grains on the bedding to give them something to do during the day, and then when I'm back from work I give them greens or other treats and I spend some more time with them.​
     

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