When to introduce guinea keets to adult.

Discussion in 'Guinea Fowl' started by tbell5611, Aug 1, 2013.

  1. tbell5611

    tbell5611 New Egg

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    Aug 1, 2013
    I have an adult female guinea hen who is separated from a flock of 23 keets. The keets are 6 weeks old. The adult stays in the coop and the keets are housed in the run. They are separated from each other by screen door. When should I introduce the adult to the keets. Also, the adult free ranges during the day. When should I allow the keets to range with her?
     
  2. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    I would release them when the keets get to at least 1/2 the hen's size. You could certainly try it before then, but I'm not sure whether the hen would be mean to the keets or not. It would be better to introduce them when the keets were large enough to defend themselves, if necessary.
     
  3. tbell5611

    tbell5611 New Egg

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    Aug 1, 2013
    I'll definitely wait then. Do you think that its possible to have them start free ranging this year or would it be best to wait until spring?
     
  4. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    I think that you could certainly let them start free ranging this year. Once they have all of their feathers in, they'll withstand almost any weather condition, and they will be hardy enough to scrounge for their own food and escape from predators.
     
  5. PeepsCA

    PeepsCA Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Young/small keets are quick easy snacks for all kinds of predators... they just aren't agile enough or predator savvy enough to survive long, and especially if they are not cooped at night. I keep mine in a predator proof coop/pen set up after they are 6 wks old for about another 6 weeks, so typically they are 12 weeks before they start free ranging. The 6 wks in the coop/pen helps to imprints that the coop/pen is their home/safety. Cooping the birds at night, every night in a predator proof coop/pen is their best bet for survival. They need to be conditioned to return to the coop tho, which will require some consistent effort on your part to establish a nightly coop-up routine.

    A young flock of free ranged Guineas that have to scrounge for their food usually won't stick around. You'll want to provide food and water for them or they may wander off in search of greener pastures, and take your older Hen with them.
     
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