When to put Outside

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Blueyes132, Nov 15, 2016.

  1. Blueyes132

    Blueyes132 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 24, 2016
    montana
    I have 7 mixed 6 week old chicks. They are in a metal cattle drinking trough inside my house right now. When should they go outside? I was told now but our weather is supposed to be in the 30s with snow. They've only been outside once. I do have a chicken coop outside with 11 other hens and roosters. Should I put them outside in the coop now? I'm conserved with the weather and cold. Thanks for ur help.
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    They're ready now but it would be better if they were acclimated first. Do you have a safe cooler space like a secure outbuilding or porch you could keep them in a couple nights?
     
  3. Blueyes132

    Blueyes132 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 24, 2016
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    I can put the trough in the coop and cover it. Will that work? I just worry abt the cold
     
  4. peterlund

    peterlund Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would be worried about the introduction more than the cold. If they are feathered, and can huddle, then they will be fine with the cold... putting them in a coop with older chickens..... that might be bad.
     
  5. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Last edited: Nov 15, 2016
  6. Blueyes132

    Blueyes132 Out Of The Brooder

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    FYI....Older chickens are 7 months old
     
  7. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

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    Introducing six-week olds to chickens still in the juvenile stage is touchy because these older ones are still immature socially and tend to feel the need to bully smaller ones. Taking measures to insure a safe integration is crucial. That's why I recommend the panic room method.

    I like to do the integration in two steps. This first step can also serve to acclimate them to the colder temps.

    First, you need to build a safe pen for the chicks in the run. Make it roomy enough for the chicks to comfortably move around and have room for food and water, and maybe a perch. This safe pen can be any sort of enclosure. While you're constructing it, make several 5 x 7 inch entrances, but cover them for the time being.

    Begin by letting the chicks spend time in the run in this safe pen with the older flock. Introduce them during the warmest part of the day, and take them back indoors when it cools down. Repeat each day for five days to a week, extending the time each day.

    At the end of this period, open the 5 x 7 inch portals and let the chicks begin to explore the rest of the run. Supervise at first in case a chick has trouble getting back into the pen if chased, which they will be. They will learn the entrances to the safe pen in no time, and soon you will feel confident in leaving them alone with the older ones.

    Give them a few days until you are certain they know their way into the safe pen, then you can move them into the coop permanently to live. They should be both acclimatized to the cold as well as used to dealing with the older flock.

    I like to move them into the coop at roosting time since it's the safest period of the day as far as being bullied. In the morning, the chicks will be chased out into the run, and they'll scoot into their safe pen.

    The first night or two, you will need to teach them to go into the coop. They will be intimidated by the older flock, so it may be a challenge. Have plenty of perching space, and they should all adjust in a week or so.
     

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