When to treat for coccidia?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by BaGAWK!!, Jan 1, 2012.

  1. BaGAWK!!

    BaGAWK!! Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I did a fecal on my teenager chickens and found coccidia. My couple questions being, 1). since I just wormed them the first time (and will repeat in 15 days), when do I treat for coccidia?

    One chicken that is not in with the young ones anymore had only 2 coccidia oocysts in his fecal. 2.) Should I treat him too or is leaving him with a light load not that burdensome to him, and actually help him create a resistance?

    Also, the teenager chickens I mentioned first are in the 'hospital coop' together being treated for vitamin deficiency. (one is being helped by vit deficiency treatment, the other was recently added to the hospital coop but now that I know they have coccidia her stumbliness could be due to that I guess). 3.) Anyway do I want to treat w/Sulmet OR Corrid, thinking one or the other might be better for something else that could be causing their stumbling and weak legs?
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2012
  2. BaGAWK!!

    BaGAWK!! Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Does anyone have any ideas? Im mainly concerned about when to treat for coccidia since I'm in the middle of my worming series. And also what the best is to use, Sulmet or Corrid.
     
  3. snowflake

    snowflake Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would treat the cocci as soon as possible. I just lost 4 birds to it. I can't get the corid around here, my Vet said to use Sulfadimethoxine which I think is the same as the sulmet. Many people here use the corid so it must work well and I don't think you need to toss the eggs with corid.....don't know about your other problem [​IMG]
     
  4. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress Premium Member

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    If they look sick, I would treat right away. If they look normal, a few cocci in their stool is probably normal.
    I use sulfadimethoxine. Sulmet is different but it's a sulfa too. Corrid is fine. Any one will do.
     
  5. Chicken_Pauper

    Chicken_Pauper Chillin' With My Peeps

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    When you worm, you repeat the treatment in ten days.

    "They say" Corid is easier on the system than Sulmet is? Sulmet is not indicated for laying chickens at all.... so.. I would have a very long withholding period for eggs if I used it.

    I would not give both worming medicine and Corid at the same time. What wormer are you using?

    Maybe do this:

    Valbazen, orally to each individual chicken...

    Repeat Valbazen again, orally, to each chicken.... ten days after first dose.

    Give Corid or Sulmet in water (to all young, or to flock).... ten days after second dose of worming medicine.

    Eggs are to be withheld from the first worming.. from day one / start of worming, until at least three full weeks (and I would wait four) after the Sulfa treatment (Corid or Sulmet). No eggs (or chickens) for eating for 50 days. My opinion, I am sure others have other opinions, this is just what I would do.

    Some Cocci, Coccidiosis is normal in all chickens, it is only a problem when it gets to be too much for a young chicken to handle.... overloads their system.

    How old are the "teenagers"? Use the Search here on BYC for "giving oral medications", "worming with Valbazen"... "Treating for Coccidiosis, "treating for Cocci", "how much Valbazen to give", "Egg withholding, egg withdrawal with Corid / Sulmet"... etc...

    There is generally blood, clearly bloody poop with cocci / Coccidiosis, when it's a problem, causing a problem.... from what I have read here?

    http://happyhenhouse.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=poop&action=display&thread=7588

    http://fowlfacts.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=afflictiondiseaseff&action=display&thread=1213

    http://sites.google.com/site/moodysbantams/poultry-health-1/coccidiosis

    Best of luck.
     
  6. mama24

    mama24 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Why do you say no eating for *50* days??? Everything I have seen says 10. I actually just did a search and found that the half life is only a few hours. A study showed that even at 50 times the normal dose, the levels of Amprolium (Corid) iwere indectectible in eggs by 10 days after withdrawing the medication. Do you have anything to back up your 50 day recommendation? 50 days is a really really long time!
     
  7. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Quote:There is no withdrawal period for corid, the eggs are safe to eat. Corid treats all 9 types of cocci that chickens can get. Sulmet has a 10 day withdrawal period and only treats 2 types of cocci.
    It is also harsh on the chickens system.
     
  8. mama24

    mama24 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:There is no withdrawal period for corid, the eggs are safe to eat. Corid treats all 9 types of cocci that chickens can get. Sulmet has a 10 day withdrawal period and only treats 2 types of cocci.
    It is also harsh on the chickens system.

    Thanks! That's what I thought! So no withdrawal period necessary for Corid. 10 days is overkill, why the heck is the previous poster recommending 50 days???
     

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