Where can I get Sulmet or Corid?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by mighty, Aug 18, 2008.

  1. mighty

    mighty New Egg

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    Aug 18, 2008
    I'm pretty positive that 2 new chickens that my friend got (yes I know one shouldn't introduce 2 adult chicken strangers to a flock, but what's done is done) have coccidia, judging from the blood in their poo (I'm farmsitting for my friend).

    They are separated now and I'd like to put them on Sulmet or Corid but I've called and visited all the local feed stores, agways, etc. and they don't sell Sulmet or Corid (only Terramyacin). I believe I could get some if I take the chickens to a vet but they're not my chickens and I don't have that money to spend on them.

    Where do people get Sulmet and/or Corid from?

    Also, should ivomec injections be done when a chick is young? Or is that not true in a backyard, free-ranging flock? How important is ivomec for them?

    Thanks for any help.
     
  2. chickenzoo

    chickenzoo Emu Hugger

    Sulmet & Corid liquid can often be found at TSC, some feed stores but if not you can order it - Jeffers Equine has it in their livestock dept. I would use the Corid first because Sulmet can cause more bleeding, use corid for 7 days. wait 21 days then use Sulmet. Do not use 2 Sulfa meds at same time or back to back. I use corid, wait 21 days , use Levasol Hydrocloride, wait 21 days, use Wazine , wait 21 days then start again if their is a bad prob. with worms. Ivomec is helpful with some worms, and lice/mites etc. Using the above method will kill most types of worms that a chicken can get. How old are the chickens?......Others use some more natural items like pumpkin seeds or apple cider vinager for some types of worms. Best bet for cocci is Corid.
     
  3. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    If there is already blood in the poo, they are pretty far along and you need to get them on a drug as the preventatives mentioned can't treat the problem. Your feed stores were the best bet but I think there are places you can order online. Get it ASAP though because once the blood shows, they often only have a few days left. Terramycin won't do anything because cocci is not a bacteria.
     
  4. sammi

    sammi Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 21, 2007
    Southeast USA
    is it possible the people who are answering the phones at the stores you're calling don't know what the heck they're talking about?[​IMG]

    Sulmet is usually widely available everywhere..tho I also prefer the Corid (amprolium).
    it might be worth going to a few stores and looking yourself.
    when you call, what are you asking for?
     
  5. mighty

    mighty New Egg

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    Aug 18, 2008
    Thanks all for your help.

    As it turns out, I happened upon some Sulmet finally and started them on that because it can treat coccsidia and I now have it easily at hand.

    I don't know how old these new chickens are, probably 2 years or so I would imagine, because they're debeaked red laying hens and would have been slaughtered by now if they were any older.

    But since I've separated them, I've seen slightly bloody poo in the flock. The flock contains some adults (2 years or so), some juveniles (few months), and some chicks (maybe a little less than 2 months). Does anyone know if it's safe to put the youngest chickens on Sulmet, because I'd like to treat the whole flock now...?
     
  6. Gargoyle

    Gargoyle Overrun With Chickens

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    Fox Valley, IL
    My Coop
    Quote:I've been calling vets, feed stores and tractor supply in Kane County, IL, none of them have heard of Corid.
    The website for Tractor Supply says they have three varieties of feed with Amprolium for young chicks, but it doesn't list the solution or powder. I haven't asked about Sulmet, the Tractor Supply website only lists huge $65 bottles of it (I just have three chickens, one started pooping wet red brown stuff today, I'd like to catch the cocci early!)

    Any ideas?
     
  7. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    Thread is almost 3 years old. [​IMG]

    Wet red-brown poops could be cecal poops. Your chicks will become listless and stop eating before blood red, who had a bloody nose?, colored poops show up. If they have never touched soil or adults, they can't have cocci, and if they have not touched soil, bring them some so they can gain an immunity.


    I don't know about your area, but if you just go to your store, they might just have a packet of powder or a small bottle of liquid sulmet in the cattle/swine area.
     
  8. Gargoyle

    Gargoyle Overrun With Chickens

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    Apr 13, 2011
    Fox Valley, IL
    My Coop
    Sorry, I'd done a search and hadn't noticed this thread was 3 years old. [​IMG]

    I saw that Tractor Supply had grit with amprolium (the active ingredient of Corid) so I drove up there to get it, and found that (even though they told me they don't carry it) they had one single package of Corid on the shelf. Yay! You were right about going to the store and searching.

    Only one of the three had the red brown wet poop today, so I gave her two eye droppers full of the mix (I put one tbsp in one gallon of water), gave the other two each one eyedropper, and then put the rest of the gallon in their one gallon waterer. I'll clean the coop tomorrow, get rid of the old wet leaves and give them clean dry leaves. Thanks BYC for being a place full of info!
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2011
  9. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    Glad you were able to find what you need! Lots of stores have things they don't even know they have. LOL
     
  10. Gargoyle

    Gargoyle Overrun With Chickens

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    316
    Apr 13, 2011
    Fox Valley, IL
    My Coop
    Fingers crossed, but I think by spotting it early and jumping on a solution quickly I may have quashed the problem. Yesterday one hen was doing a lot of moist soft red brown poop, but today everything is looking normal. She has a strong appetite (as always). We gave all three of them Corid with an eyedropper last night and replaced their gallon waterer (I mixed 1 tbsp of 20% Soluble Powder for 1 gal water)

    I also shoveled out the piles of old wet leaves, and dug a trench around the coop area (they have a 4x6' coop in an 8 x 20' fenced in area, concrete floor which I've covered with leaves and crushed/powdered limestone) so when it rains the mud doesn't wash into their area.

    edit: I spoke too soon- her poop today is a mix of brown, wet runny red and some white lumps. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2011

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