Where/how to get a necropsy done?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by luvmybirdz, Jan 3, 2013.

  1. luvmybirdz

    luvmybirdz Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 11, 2011
    I'm still having issues w/my birds after treating them multiple times for anything I think may be going on. I was going to add antibiotic to the water today, but saw diff dosage for diff issues. We found a newly sick roo yesterday, so I considered trying to find out about having a necropsy done. The first vet I called said it would be $400 for the testing [​IMG]. There's NO way that's happening. The other vet said they knew of no place that did that sort of thing. So...is there a place you can send one off to be done? If so what kind of cost would I be looking at?
    I'm just over this and need to get these guys better. I will say, letting them loose free ranging in my yard did them a ton of good. They had a VERY large area already, but our issues began when we put the goats with them. The most odd part is that it's almost 100% the roo's that are being affected (dying), aside from the hens not laying a single egg in months! Any help would be appreciated. I'd love to have the testing done if reasonable enough to afford it.
     
  2. sjshaw1980

    sjshaw1980 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Try your local agricultural extension, they may be able to help.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. cowcreekgeek

    cowcreekgeek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Choices as to where to get a necropsy performed is dependent upon where you're at -- consider contacting your local Coiunty Extension Service, as some folks can get 'em done at little or no cost.

    Also, you oughta start a new thread detailing your symptoms and historical information, as somebody might be able to help you pin down the problem -- it's never a good idea to just randomly throw antibiotics around, as they're rarely gonna help unless it a very specific thing you're treating.

    The fact your hens quit laying? Most probably a symptom of whatever's been killing the roosters. How they stopped (suddenly, or over which period of time) and changes to their qualities can often further pinpoint a disease/illness.
     
  4. luvmybirdz

    luvmybirdz Out Of The Brooder

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    Good idea on the extension office. I'll do that tomorrow. I've posted before but never get things figured out. It started when they and the goats were brought together in the same area. Goats infected with strongyles, treated them. Found that they were transferable to the birds (can't keep them from eating goat poo). Treated them for it as well as for any possible lice. Retreated as directed. Completely cleaned out the coop, cleaned up feed/water containers/areas, etc. since then, I let them back out of their yard and they happily roam all over. look healthier, happier and put on some weight that had been lost.
    They were amazing and healthy before the goats.I'm totally lost and want them better!
    If I could take a live one to a vet, what tests could they do...or is that a ridiculous thing to do?
     
  5. cowcreekgeek

    cowcreekgeek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Certainly worth considering, as live birds can provide far more information, and freezing obscures some informations. However, it tends to be really hard on the health of the one submitted for testing ~'-)

    I'm thinkin' it might be worth givin' them a little post-goat recovery time. I'm a big fan of Odoban for reducing the potential for viral/bacterial infection(s), as it's only ten bucks for what make 32 gallons, and I spray it everywhere. If you see tapeworms, then use Albendazole, but -- even if you see no signs of worms? I'd consider dosing the w/ fenbendazole at the rate of 20 mg/kg for three consecutive days, unless you've wormed recently. And, there's a good chance some have been molting recently, and the days are gettin' shorter -- that explains most drops in egg production this time of year.

    Again? It still varies from place to place, but for more information on necropsy, see the following URLs ...

    http://www.dcpah.msu.edu/sections/necropsy/WEBCD.NEC.REF.001.pdf

    http://www.ncagr.gov/vet/ncvdl/VetLabServicesNecropsy.html

    http://www.caes.uga.edu/publications/pubDetail.cfm?pk_id=7428
     

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