Where's the best place to give a chicken fluids?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by crystalchik, Jul 12, 2010.

  1. crystalchik

    crystalchik Chillin' With My Peeps

    309
    2
    141
    Jan 15, 2008
    Central Florida
    I have a young silkie suffering from a respiratory illness and she's gasping. I think she has the ability to recover, but she's not drinking and I dont want to force water down her or tube her since she's gasping. Is there a good place to give her fluids with a syringe and needle? I think that would be best for her. Its very hot here in FL around 100*F and she needs lots of fluids esp since she's sick.
    Any advice would also be appreciated.
    By the way, Oxine is on its way here! I heard that would help
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2010
  2. LynneP

    LynneP Chillin' With My Peeps

    Even though a chick or an adult may not drink when dehydrated or cold/ill, there is a way to stimulate them to drink. It's called the sipping reflex, and it means that if a drop of fluid lands on the beak, they will automatically sip at it. This is very useful for offering electrolytes/liquid meds by dropper or oil for impactions. You must avoid the nares (nose holes) though to prevent aspiration, and be sure to stay there with the bird long enough to administer several mls. It's useful to have a needle-less syringe marked, like baby syringes or vet syringes. 5 ml of most liquids would be a minimum, and remember that when using this method some will be wasted, so have a rag or towel on your lap if that is how you are positioned with the bird. In an emergency though,you could use a plastic straw or eyedropper, sometimes you need to spring into action. The drops should normally land on the curve of the beak. If the bird is restless, try dimming the lights.

    But you need to find out what this is and get meds. Time for the vet. Now TSC and some other places sell antibiotic/vitamin mixes, but getting specific help is always better. DO NOT WAIT, birds go fast from respiratory ailments.
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2010

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by