Which crosses produce feather-sexable chicks?

hkb

Chirping
Jun 29, 2019
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I posted this thread about a chick I have and it made me wonder about breeding hybrids that can be feather sexed. Information on this doesn't seem to be as readily available as information on sex-linked colours. From what I understand, a cross between fast-feathering and slow-feathering birds can potentially produce offspring that can be feather-sexed, no? How do I find out which breeds are fast or slow feathering?

Note: I'm curious about the topic more so than invested in the sex of this particular chick (I'm convinced she's a hen by her behaviour, but that's just a hunch, anyway, doesn't matter :))
 

hkb

Chirping
Jun 29, 2019
68
222
96
Southern Alberta
Here is a list I made. The only correction is that Australorps are slow feathering, not fast feathering.
https://www.backyardchickens.com/th...ics-for-feather-sexing.1318463/#post-21492909
Thanks! I love that this thread is about the same cross as my chick (silkie/EE). I didn't take a pic of my chick when the contrast was really stark (at 2-3 days, the chick had quite a bit of feathering), but I'm certain she has a fast-feathering gene, and since she didn't get it from the purebred silkie roo, she must have gotten it from the EE hen.

So, if I understand this correctly, the heterozygotes are certainly female and the homozygotes have a 33% chance of being female, because a roo can't be heterozygous for a sex-linked trait.
 

Cyprus

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Thanks! I love that this thread is about the same cross as my chick (silkie/EE). I didn't take a pic of my chick when the contrast was really stark (at 2-3 days, the chick had quite a bit of feathering), but I'm certain she has a fast-feathering gene, and since she didn't get it from the purebred silkie roo, she must have gotten it from the EE hen.

So, if I understand this correctly, the heterozygotes are certainly female and the homozygotes have a 33% chance of being female, because a roo can't be heterozygous for a sex-linked trait.
Correct.
 

nicalandia

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So, if I understand this correctly, the heterozygotes are certainly female and the homozygotes have a 33% chance of being female, because a roo can't be heterozygous for a sex-linked trait.


Not quite..!

In allosome genes the females are Hemizygous and males can be either Homozygous or Heterozygous..!
 

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