Which Ducks to keep?? (UPDATE-pics)

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by 1lpoock, Sep 1, 2009.

  1. 1lpoock

    1lpoock Spruce Creek Waterfowl

    Apr 20, 2009
    Sandusky, Ohio
    I currently have two breeding trios of khaki campbells and two trios also of cayugas. I am selling a khaki and cayuga trio at an upcoming auction. I am trying to decide which ducks to keep out of the 6 of each breed. I want to keep the nicest quality ducks that meet the standard as close as possible because i plan to sell their eggs and ducklings. If anyone knows these two breeds' standards please post!, it would be very helpful. I will try to get some pictures of every duck up tomorrow, and everyone can help me decide which ducks to hold on to! Thanks
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2009
  2. 1lpoock

    1lpoock Spruce Creek Waterfowl

    Apr 20, 2009
    Sandusky, Ohio
    **I originally thought i had two trios of cayugas, but on further inspection, I realized that I have three males and three females of cayuga***

    Mainly I want to pick out the drakes to keep, but I'm putting the hens up here so you guys can help me choose also [​IMG]

    P.S. There is a body and head shot for each duck!

    Lets get started..........

    CAYUGA
    Male #1
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Male #2
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Just had to add a picture of his drake feathers
    [​IMG]

    Male #3
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Female #1
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Female #2
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Female #3
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    okay now the....

    KHAKI CAMPBELLS!
    I got really lucky and have some pretty nice khaki campbells, i can't decide! [​IMG]

    Male #1
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Male #2
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I dont know what a standard campbell's bill is for a drake....#1 has a bright yellow green bill while #2 has that same bill with a few coats of white and grey...if you know what i mean

    Female#1
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Female #2
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Female #3
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Female #4
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    ***Thats it, if the pics are too big just reload the page....when replying it would be nice if you could give me (for each breed) your favorite trio (male and 2 females....thanks!
     
  3. 1lpoock

    1lpoock Spruce Creek Waterfowl

    Apr 20, 2009
    Sandusky, Ohio
    Also...how do you think the ducks will do over the winter...do you think these breeds are pretty hardy?
     
  4. rainplace

    rainplace Interstellar Duck Academy

    I find the first male to be the most stunning. However, I think (remember I'm new to this so get conformation) that the purple on the male is a fault. You're looking for green and blue, but not purple or brown in blacks. However talking with Dave Holderread last week he was telling me, if I remember correctly, that purple can be stress related and won't necessarily carry over to the next molt. (of course that could just be blue I'm looking at)

    Sorry that is all I have for you. I'm looking at this thread with interest, and putting my guess out there as a test for myself.

    They are all beautiful.
     
  5. streemers

    streemers Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 13, 2008
    port orchard,WA
    Quote:yes they should be fine over the winter
     
  6. 1lpoock

    1lpoock Spruce Creek Waterfowl

    Apr 20, 2009
    Sandusky, Ohio
    I think purple and brown are a fault on black east indies...i remember reading that...i think it doesnt matter for cayugas
     
  7. rainplace

    rainplace Interstellar Duck Academy

    It's also a fault in black runners and cayugas.

    "Storey's Guide to Raising Ducks" buy Dave Holderread, says on page 56 about Cayugas, "Everything else being equal, the greener the plumage and the blacker the bill, legs and feet. the better." He goes on to say that purple comes about from long exposure to bright sunlight.

    When I was buying my black runners, he held each one and showed me their faults and their perfections. In young birds you don't want white around the eyes or directly under the bill. Elsewhere in small amounts seems to be okay, as in the white can be tweezed out for shows.

    He does have a two dollar publication on Cayugas you can send him a check and a note on which publication you want and Millie will send it out to you.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2009
  8. Sweetfolly

    Sweetfolly Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,123
    21
    191
    Apr 17, 2009
    Kildare, Wisconsin
    KEEP THEM ALL! [​IMG]

    I was supposed to keep no more than 7 of my 10 ducklings from Sandhill Preservation Center this year. [​IMG]

    I ended up with 2 female Runners, a male/female pair of Dutch Hookbills that are inseparable, and two trios of Dark Campbells.

    I planned on selling one of the Dark Campbell trios, but...after I gave them all names and watched them grow into beautiful almost-grown-up specimens, I couldn't decide which trio to keep. So - Bramble, Bubbles, Piper, Nutmeg, Amy, and Ember are ALL staying.

    And I have to build yet ANOTHER duck pen before winter. [​IMG]

    Of course, I can't resist sharing a picture of the little buggers while I'm on the subject:

    [​IMG]
     
  9. 1lpoock

    1lpoock Spruce Creek Waterfowl

    Apr 20, 2009
    Sandusky, Ohio
    wow they sure have grown!
    I cant keep them all though i really wish i could, they are trained so good. I just want to get more in the spring and my parents wont let me get more unless i sell some right now.
     
  10. rainplace

    rainplace Interstellar Duck Academy

    I'm very interested in the Cayuga because the coloring problems are similar to the coloring problems of the black runner.

    I found this today stringing these words - cayuga duck show quality - in google

    from this site:
    http://www.domestic-waterfowl.co.uk/cayuga.htm

    "Breeding for and holding the brilliant green sheen probably causes more problems for breeders than any other trait. A fairly common problem exists in that Cayuga females and especially the most brilliant green ones, tend to moult in white feathers in their body plumage with age. This is not to be confused with white under the Jaw (which should be culled out in young birds). These white body feathers usually appear in females after their first adult moult, and becomes more prevalent in each successive moult until some females appear almost pure white after 5 or 6 years of age. While some females don't get white body feathers until their 3rd or 4th year, these are usually the self same individuals that lacked the maximum sheen to begin with. So the breeder is faced with a problem. In order to show old females he largely must be content with birds with a little less lustre effect on the sheen of his young birds. One may breed these females to brilliant green drakes with good results although if this practice is continued year after year, I believe the breeder will notice an overall dulling effect on the sheen of young birds . On the other hand if extremely brilliant green birds are bred together year in and year out the white ageing in females will continue until the young females in their first fall may start to show white body feathers. "

    "By the way Cayuga males rarely if ever turn - white with age. Some may develop white bibs or white under jaw when they first feather in and these males should be culled. From then on Cayuga drakes stay black their entire life. Bill coloring is rather easily bred for; the standard calling for pure black in both sexes. A small amount of slate or green at the tip of the bill of an otherwise good bird is nothing to worry about. Yellow in the bill however should not be tolerated in the show or breed pen The standard calls for black legs and feet and this also is not a problem once fixed in a blood line. Males may show some reddish orange cast to their legs as they age and this more or less is normal but should be guarded against in young birds. "

    American Standard of Perfection which I found here:
    http://books.google.com/books?pg=PA...lt&id=ho4aAAAAYAAJ&ots=EVvkZlUovb&output=text

    Says, "CAYUGA DUCKS

    Disqualifications.

    White in any part of plumage ; twisted wing ; crooked back ; decidedly wry tail. (See general disqualifications.)

    Standard Weights.

    Adult Drake 8 lbs. Adult Duck 7 lbs.

    Young Drake 7 lbs. Young Duck 6 lbs.

    SHAPE OF DRAKE AND DUCK.

    Head—Long, finely formed.

    Bill —Long, top line slightly depressed.

    Eyes—Full.

    Neck—Of medium length, slightly arched.

    Back—Long, broad.

    Breast—Broad, full, prominent.

    Body—Long, deep, broad.

    Wings—Short, folded closely and smoothly against sides.

    Tail—Only slightly elevated ; composed of hard, stiff feathers; sex feathers of drake, hard, well curled.

    Legs and Toes—Thighs, short, large ; shanks, of medium length and size. Toes, straight, connected by web.

    Carriage of Body—Nearly horizontal.

    COLOR OF DRAKE AND DUCK.
    BUI—Black.
    Eyes—Dark hazel.

    Shanks and Toes—Dark slate or black, the latter preferred. Plumage—Lustrous greenish-black throughout, except primaries of duck, which sometimes are dark brown."

    I hope this helps.
     

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