Which horse breed is better?

Bigwig

Songster
5 Years
Jan 8, 2015
345
20
101
NC
I am thinking about getting a horse (eventually) and have decided on getting either a Tennessee Walking horse or a Percheron. Which breed is better for a beginner?
 

Stacykins

Crowing
9 Years
Jan 19, 2011
4,355
233
258
Escanaba, MI
It all depends on how the individual horse trained and how experienced they are, that is the only way one of those two is 'better'. And those are two radically different breeds of horses. What is your goal? What are you wanting to do?

Do you have a mentor who can evaluate any horse you choose? Are you already taking riding lessons? What experience do you have with horses? Have you groomed, mucked stalls, taken care of tack, etc.?
 

Bunnylady

POOF Goes the Pooka
11 Years
Nov 27, 2009
18,760
9,785
641
Wilmington, NC
That's a little bit like asking, "which kind of fruit tastes better, apples or grapes?" There are lots of kinds of apples, lots of kinds of grapes, and they can vary widely in flavor - it generally boils down to what appeals to you.

Within any breed of horse, there are wonderful animals, and there are bound to be a few "bad apples." Generally speaking, what a beginner needs is a rock-solid, sensible, well-trained animal, regardless of breed. You need an animal that is physically and mentally suited to whatever it is that you want to do with them, and that may not be an animal of either breed that you have selected.

In addition to a "been there, done that" horse, you also need a trainer. While this person may not be giving you formal lessons, you will at least need to be able to pick their brains about problems you are encountering. And yes, there will be problems. Even the best-trained horse is going to test its handler to see what it can get away with. Perfectly well-intended owners can wind up completely unable to control what was a very well-behaved animal in a surprisingly short period of time. IMO, the mentor should come first; they can then help you to find an animal that will work for you.
 

Bigwig

Songster
5 Years
Jan 8, 2015
345
20
101
NC
It all depends on how the individual horse trained and how experienced they are, that is the only way one of those two is 'better'. And those are two radically different breeds of horses. What is your goal? What are you wanting to do?

Do you have a mentor who can evaluate any horse you choose? Are you already taking riding lessons? What experience do you have with horses? Have you groomed, mucked stalls, taken care of tack, etc.?

I would like to ride the horse.
I do have a mentor.
I have been taking riding lessons.
I have done basic care for a friends horse's, including: grooming, feeding, etc.
 

Bigwig

Songster
5 Years
Jan 8, 2015
345
20
101
NC
Ride how? English or Western?

Pleasure/trail riding or something competitive?

If you want to compete, what venue are you wanting to compete in? Open rail classes? Breed rail classes? Jumping? Dressage? Endurance?

Prefer English though I've ridden Western stile.

Pleasure/trail riding.
 

LI chickie

Chirping
Apr 7, 2015
186
9
63
Long Island
I was 23 when I finally got my own horse. I used to go to a hack barn and work for free to ride. I started taking people out on trail as a trail guide and the horse I was riding for almost 2 years was being sold. Broke my heart. Anyway please be sure you are fully able to commit your time for your horse.
 

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