Which Rooster Breeds Get Along??

HiEverybirdy

Chirping
May 5, 2020
111
291
83
Cosby, TN
Will any roosters of the following breeds definitely not get along with other roosters in a bachelor area with no hens in sight?
  • Welsummer
  • Barnevelder
  • Breda
  • Black Copper Marans
  • Ameraucana
  • Silver Gray Dorking
  • Hamburg
  • Silverudd’s Blue
  • Bantam Brahma
  • Barred Rock
  • Salmon Faverolle
  • Brown Leghorn
  • Houdon
  • Crevecoeur
We’re in the planning phase of growing our flock. We'd like to try 3-4 of the above breeds. We started with sexed hatchery chicks but want to begin supporting dedicated breeders and buying straight run so are building a large bachelor area. Some roosters may live out their lives with us, some may be occasional breeders, some may be meals.

I'm thinking males of some breeds aren't as suited for fraternity life. Who will cause the least grief in the chicken yard? We’re prepared to separate or cull but find that research sets us off on the good foot, so insights are appreciated.
 

AgnesGray

Songster
Mar 8, 2019
925
2,651
186
Ohio, US
My Coop
The worst that I have had on that list have been Ameraucana. They were completely nuts. BUT..... I think this depends on the individual bird a LOT. I have 10+ boys right now and the ones that came as chicks do fine because my head rooster keeps everyone in line in a steady and non-aggressive way. On a side-note, head rooster's brother that hatched on the same day and grew up in the exact same setting was sweet with me, but was a total jerk with other chickens.

The biggest factor seems to be if they grew up together. If I bring in a cockerel that is more than a month - 6 weeks old, it usually will not end well. One trouble maker and they all seem to start fighting, too.

If they live together from day 1 and are not separated long enough to forget each other, they will often be just fine, but occasionally there will be a bird that wants to stage a coup and tries to fight with everyone else.
 

HiEverybirdy

Chirping
May 5, 2020
111
291
83
Cosby, TN
Thanks, @AgnesGray! I'd heard Ameraucanas could be touchy.

Thanks also for the thoughts on integrating young. I'd heard cockerels should meet before one group's "wattles come in" (basically before cockerel chicks develop their attitudes). That definitely helps determine what time of year to bring in new chicks, since it has to be warm enough to put them out ASAP.

Had also heard that their memories are short and they can't be separated long. Testosterone is a heck of a drug.
 

AgnesGray

Songster
Mar 8, 2019
925
2,651
186
Ohio, US
My Coop
Thanks, @AgnesGray! I'd heard Ameraucanas could be touchy.

Thanks also for the thoughts on integrating young. I'd heard cockerels should meet before one group's "wattles come in" (basically before cockerel chicks develop their attitudes). That definitely helps determine what time of year to bring in new chicks, since it has to be warm enough to put them out ASAP.

Had also heard that their memories are short and they can't be separated long. Testosterone is a heck of a drug.
It sure is! Haha

This is one of the many reasons I brood outside. Has been a game changer. :) Good luck!
 

AgnesGray

Songster
Mar 8, 2019
925
2,651
186
Ohio, US
My Coop
The area under my roosting bars is closed off as a brooder so they can see each other. They have a heat plate and can start to come out through their baby door at a few weeks old, but can zip back in as they feel necessary. By 4 weeks old they are sleeping on the nest bars and fully integrated. I read about it in an article here and it has really worked for us. :) https://www.backyardchickens.com/ar...and-start-raising-your-chicks-outdoors.71995/

Heat plate is on the other side, but I took this pic last night and you get the idea.
20200802_201432.jpg

All ages together... Destroying my plants :D
20200713_201009.jpg
 

Mrs. K

Free Ranging
10 Years
Nov 12, 2009
8,306
9,409
596
western South Dakota
I think breed is the least predictive indicator. I would go with the SIZE of your set up, the number of birds that you have, and where you have your bachelor pen as being more important for success.

But I would make a suggestion. In a flock like you are describing, birds move in and out of the flock. You need a pretty solid rotations for both hens and roosters. I think you might have considerable more success, if you add a new breed - straight run in one year. Adding other breeds each year that follows.

But a lot depend on your over all numbers, your overall space, and really your overall goals. I apologize if this is not your misconception, but sometimes it is for new people. You do not have to have a matching rooster for every breed of hens in flock. Just pick the eggs you want to set from the hens that match the rooster. Next year, new rooster, new group of eggs. Might work better.

Mrs K
 

HiEverybirdy

Chirping
May 5, 2020
111
291
83
Cosby, TN
The area under my roosting bars is closed off as a brooder so they can see each other. They have a heat plate and can start to come out through their baby door at a few weeks old, but can zip back in as they feel necessary. By 4 weeks old they are sleeping on the nest bars and fully integrated. I read about it in an article here and it has really worked for us. :) https://www.backyardchickens.com/ar...and-start-raising-your-chicks-outdoors.71995/
That’s cool! I was thinking about something like that at some point. The early integration seems to work better for absolutely everyone involved. Love the little Light Brahma just hangin’ with the big kids.
 

HiEverybirdy

Chirping
May 5, 2020
111
291
83
Cosby, TN
I think breed is the least predictive indicator. I would go with the SIZE of your set up, the number of birds that you have, and where you have your bachelor pen as being more important for success.

But I would make a suggestion. In a flock like you are describing, birds move in and out of the flock. You need a pretty solid rotations for both hens and roosters. I think you might have considerable more success, if you add a new breed - straight run in one year. Adding other breeds each year that follows.

But a lot depend on your over all numbers, your overall space, and really your overall goals. I apologize if this is not your misconception, but sometimes it is for new people. You do not have to have a matching rooster for every breed of hens in flock. Just pick the eggs you want to set from the hens that match the rooster. Next year, new rooster, new group of eggs. Might work better.

Mrs K
Thanks, I'm not sure I totally understand all of this, but I'd like to. Here's the size of the layout:
  • We have a 2,000-square-foot yard for layers (surrounded by 6' fence with electric and other predator measures) with 3 coops: 4x4', 3x6', and 6x8'.
  • The bachelor run will be 1,000 square feet, adjacent to the layer yard but blocked from view (so they can hear but not see the ladies), with 1-2 coops.
We currently have 11 chickens. Everything's spacious and peaceful. I like it that way so plan to max at 20 females and 8 males at any given time. We aren't planning a big operation.

Our goals are to produce eggs and some meat for ourselves, have a colorful egg rainbow for local sales, and have enough genetic variety that we can sustain the flock with a nice variety of chickens.

Not trying to match roosters with hens: just want to prepare for the amount of roosters we'll have by going straight run. My goal is to set up a harmonious bachelor yard to house some males permanently and others until they're old enough to know who to keep.

Apologies if anything is unclear. Between the time I started this and pushing "post," we had to chase off yet another set of trespassers who have been sneaking up the mountain lately, so I sorta lost my focus.
 

Chickassan

Wattle Fondler
May 23, 2017
14,157
70,170
1,297
Greenville S.C, formerly Noneya U.S.A
Salmon Faverolles most likely would they're individuals so nothing is ever 100%
The two here get along even with hens, and they tolerated a mystery rooster that popped in shockingly well.
They showed their guest the door when he tried stopping the senior male mating.
They worked as a team, it was interesting to watch for sure.:)
 

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