Which rooster?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by gracejr, Apr 8, 2012.

  1. gracejr

    gracejr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Seriously considering getting a rooster to go with our pullets. We want one eventually anyway, but I'm thinking it might be easier to introduce one now to a flock of pullets than it would be to wait until next year when we have an already established flock of mature hens... I need something that will be decent around kids, so I'm thinking an Orpington of Brahma would be our best option. They will have a large run, won't be free ranging. Our flock will consist of 2 Orpingtons, 2 EEs, 1 Golden Comet and one black sexlink. May also be getting a brahma pullet, but not sure yet.

    I saw a 2yo splash Orpington on CL that sounded nice so emailed about him. Here's what she wrote about him.

    "He is friendly with caution. I guess it is hard to explain but i have to be honest. The only time he gives us a problem is when we are not paying attention to what we are doing. For example: he went after my leg when I stepped off the steps rite next to him and his hens. He is a good rooster. Really takes care of his hens. Keeps them in the yard and always has his eye on them. Will never take food from you without making sure his hens are fed yet. I really love this boy he has been a pet since he was hatched."

    Thoughts? I'll be going to a swap the end of the month, should I just wait and see what is available there? Or do you think he'd be a good fit?
     
  2. Peachesbabychick

    Peachesbabychick Chillin' With My Peeps

    I would 100% recommend an Orpington cockerel. This is the most docile, beautiful breed out there. You can't go wrong! Splash is gorgeous, I would go for it!

    Good Luck!

    -Peaches
     
  3. gracejr

    gracejr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Would you worry about things like this with kids around? Granted, he won't be free ranging, but the kids will want to go in the coop to play with the chickens. The youngest is a very petite almost 2, other kiddo is 5.5

    "he went after my leg when I stepped off the steps rite next to him and his hens. "
     
  4. Albanese07

    Albanese07 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would defiantly worry. I think you could find a better behaved rooster expessialy with small children around. You don't want someone else's trouble! Just my opinion .
     
  5. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    If your kids are going to go into the pen, I would not get that rooster. Roosters and small kids can be a bad combination. Kids are smaller than adults, move more quickly, and are louder. If your kids are going to "play with the chickens", a rooster might feel the need to protect his hens from those little intruders. I have a brahma roo who is very good with adults and my 2 & 3 year old grand nephew and niece - as in, he ignores them. But they have never gone into the coop to play with the chickens, and have never been unsupervised with the chickens.
     
  6. naillikwj82

    naillikwj82 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It would be prudent to quarentine any new addition to your flock, whether now or next season. The usual questions:
    What will be the purpose of the rooster?
    To increase or perpetuate the flock? Dual purpose for meat?
    If those are your reasons, then next spring find the unwanted roosters (which are many) from craigslist, make a selection, quarentine within site of your hens, when safe, integrate with your flock.
    Choose wisely!
     
  7. gracejr

    gracejr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Just to clarify, the kids would never be allowed in there unsupervised. Or at least not until they're older. But even with supervision, it only takes a second for something to happen, yk? The main purpose of the flock right now will be for eggs, but the oldest has already claimed one of our future birds as his own "pet". He'll be helping with feeding and collecting eggs (supervised).

    And yes, the rooster would be for a dual purpose flock, though we won't be starting in to meat until next year most likely. Figure we'll let some of the hens lay when they go broody, keep a few, sell any excess pullets and grow the cockerels for meat. On that note, are hens any good for meat? Maybe it'd be better to keep all of any particular batch and raise all the extras for meat, instead of just the males?


    Would you say this guy is typical of an Orpington? It seems like everybody says they're such gentle guys. Am I on par for thinking we should get either an Orpington or Brahma? It will be a mixed flock of hens with eggers, orpingtons, brahma, and sexlinks/comets.
     
  8. naillikwj82

    naillikwj82 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We currently have a 10 pound buff orp rooster, and yes he is docile and friendly. However once in awhile he will try to test who is boss, and he finds out it's not him! Our birds are not free range, but in a moving coop. Can you eat hens? ABSOLUTELY
     
  9. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Overrun With Chickens

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    Really strongly recommend not getting a rooster with children that small. You can ruin the whole chicken experience with kids that small and a rooster. The roo's brain is quite small and the hormones are quite strong, and with kids at eye level it is not worth it.

    IMHO it would be better to buy a few chicks to stick under a broody hen, or fertilized eggs from somewhere else at least, (just a couple of years) until the youngest is about 5. Until then it is hard to depend on either the child, who falls or stumbles, scaring the rooster, or the rooster just deciding to figure out who is the boss, and a face is badly scratched or eyes damaged.

    Buff's are suppose to be pretty good, but you are depending to much on something that cannot really reason.

    MrsK
     
  10. RedDrgn

    RedDrgn Anachronistic Anomaly

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    Having gone through this rooster hunt myself, I was overwhelmingly encouraged to find an older roo (1+ years) to integrate with our pullets once they had started laying. This was because we were also concerned with behavior, and with an older bird (like the one you mentioned being on CL), at least someone can tell you about their disposition. And from that description, I'd say he's a bad fit.

    Children are excellent at bringing out that absolutely worst in a roo, because they're loud, erratic, fast, and tend to act before thinking. Almost everything that is considered normal, natural behavior in a child screams THREAT, THREAT, THREAT to a roo. Even a child's size can trigger than because they're about the same height as some LF roos.

    For example, our roo is awesome with his girls and with adults, but he HATES kids and that is why we have him. He was getting wound up over kids and his previous owner knew it was only a matter of time before he hurt one of them. Every other aspect of him was described as awesome, and he's proven it. However, he's ALSO proven that his children hatred is alive and well. When our neighbor's children are out playing in their yard (which our roo cannot get to), he tends to go bananas. He struts, he flaps, and he crows his brains out until they're done.

    It also doesn't matter what breed you choose, male chicks of any variety are a crap shoot. They could turn into monsters or muffins and how you treat them may not make a bit of difference.
     

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