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Which wormer?

Discussion in 'Peafowl' started by Peanut59, Dec 3, 2013.

  1. Peanut59

    Peanut59 Out Of The Brooder

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    I have 2 adult peahens and 1 adult peacock. They are in a large grassy pen. They haven't been wormed in several months. Which wormer should I use for them now and how much?
     
  2. Peanut59

    Peanut59 Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 7, 2012
    I forgot to add. I have Wazine, fenbendazole (Safeguard) in paste form, Ivermectin injectable cattle wormer, and Valbazen I just didn't know which to use this time of year.
     
  3. MinxFox

    MinxFox Overrun With Chickens

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    I just recently finished worming mine with Safeguard but I use the liquid form not the paste. I am not sure how much of the paste to give them. [​IMG]
     
  4. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Wazine only gets roundworms, Safeguard gets almost all when enough is given 3-5 days in a row. There is a study that shows ivermectin as an ineffective wormer for poultry.

    The amount of paste one would give is the same as the liquid. 1ml of paste = 1ml of liquid, both have 100mg fenbendazole. Ignore any post you have seen about giving a pea size amount and give the paste just like the liquid.

    My vets told me to worm my peafowl at 50mg/kg, that's .5ml per 2.2 pounds to kill the cecal worm. Your average adult IB peahen should weigh 3-4 kg and the males 4-6, so a hen would get 1.5-2ml and a male would get 2-6ml. This if how I control round and cecal worms, for the others I worm with less, but do several days in a row.

    Below is an experiment I did to calculate the mg in 1ml of paste
    It's important to understand how much your bird weighs and how many mg/kg your bird should get. Giving too little worming medication can cause resistance to wormers. Do you have any idea how many mg's of wormer are in a "pea size" amount? Well I was curious, so I measured it.

    From left to right:
    Small = 10mg ( .1cc) = enough for a 200 gram (7 ounce) bird at 50mg/kg
    Medium = 25mg (.25cc) = enough for a 500 gram (17 ounce) bird at 50mg/kg
    Large = 50mg ( .5cc) = enough for a 1000 gram (35 ounce) bird at 50mg/kg
    50 mg/kg is what my vets recommended.


    [​IMG]


    Weighed empty 6cc (ml) syringe
    [​IMG]


    Filled with Panacur 10% paste and weighed. Difference is 6 grams, so 6 grams = 6cc's (ml), which means that 1ml of paste weighs one gram and is equal to 1ml of liquid.
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    -Kathy
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Ivermectin as a bird anthelmintic--trials with naturally infected domestic fowl.

    Oksanen A, Nikander S.
    Abstract

    To evaluate the use of ivermectin as a bird anthelmintic, 29 White Leghorn hens naturally infected with Ascaridia spp., Heterakis spp. and Capillaria spp. were treated with 0.2, 2 or 6 mg/kg intramuscularly or 0.2 or 0.8 mg/kg orally. Faecal samples were collected before treatment and at autopsy, 2, 6, or 16 days after treatment, when the intestines were also examined for helminths. None of the treatments gave satisfactory anthelmintic results.

    Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2816174
     
  6. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Efficacy of fenbendazole against helminth parasites of poultry in Uganda.

    Ssenyonga GS.
    Abstract

    Fenbendazole 4% (Panacur, Hoechst) administered in feed was used to treat chickens infected with Ascaridia galli, Heterakis gallinarum and Railletina spp. It was also used to treat Syngamus trachea in broiler birds. There was a marked drop in helminth egg counts in the faeces on the second day of treatment and the faeces became negative by the seventh day after the last treatment. Post-mortem examination 15 to 21 days later showed that the drug was 100% effective against Ascaridia galli and Heterakis gallinarum at 10 mg/kg. However, for complete removal of Railletina spp. 15 mg/kg was required. Similarly 20 mg/kg fenbendazole was effective against Syngamus trachea. It was concluded that fenbendazole is suitable for the treatment of the important intestinal and tracheal worms of poultry, a dose of 15 to 20 mg/kg for 3 consecutive days being recommended for use under field conditions.

    Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6750887
     
  7. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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