White light bulbs

Discussion in 'Quail' started by astronoc, Nov 20, 2016.

  1. astronoc

    astronoc Out Of The Brooder

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    I had a heat glo infrared bulb ready for the brooder but it just went out. Can I use a normal one from the store or do I need a special one? I got chicks hatching in about a week and need a bulb in place just in case the replacements I ordered do not work out.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. jojackc

    jojackc Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 18, 2016
    I bought one of those brooding bulbs and it got way to hot for my brooder. I use a 60watt light bulb for garage door openers. It is really hard to find the old fashion bulbs at the hardware store now days.
     
  3. fishermanroly

    fishermanroly Out Of The Brooder

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    Like jojackc said 60 watt bulb is the way I've done it for years. You can find them at Dollar Tree if you have one around you.
     
  4. Binki

    Binki Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ontario, Canada
    Incandescent white bulbs can provide heat, however, red light (whether it's an actual heat lamp bulb or just a colored red normal one) is ideal for brooding because it hides any red colored wounds, helps prevent pecking at each other and helps them rest better at night.

    Being in daylight 24/7 for days can cause stress to people and animals alike, perhaps leading to some aggressive chicks.

    The red light is dimmer, helping them rest and also helping to discourage chick on chick pecking - I remember shining a flashlight on newly hatched chicks and it was like turning them into a swarm of zombies - all of a sudden every piece of fluff and dust (on the birds) was vivid and apparently irresistible. Toes looked like yummy little worms. Turn off the white light leaving the red light, chicks tend to ignore each other.

    Also, anything distinctly red will cause pecking. The red light washes out red wounds whereas a red wounded bird in white light would be harassed and eventually pecked apart.

    So I'd recommend a red light [​IMG]

    *edit* I use a dimmable brooder lamp so I can lower the heat by just turning a dial - no need to raise or lower the light :)
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2016
  5. jojackc

    jojackc Out Of The Brooder

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    Might change my mind with a dimmable brooder lamp, didn't know they made those. My problem was with the brooder lamp was I was going to cook my quail chicks. Plus they are a bit scary. I didn't like leaving the house knowing something that hot was running while I was at work. Kind of like when my wife leaves the curling iron on. I would leave any lamp on in the house without any worries. I never had any chicks with wounds, if I did I would just take them away from the other chicks. I never over crowed my brooder, I think this helps them from picking on each other.
     
  6. Ravynscroft

    Ravynscroft For the Love of Duck Premium Member

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    Nov 30, 2014
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    Hardware stores, Lowe's, Home Depot, Walmart, etc carry lamp dimmer switches you can just plug your brooder light into... think they run about $10-12 each and work great...

    I brood Call ducks quite frequently and they require less heat than chicks so it's much easier... :)
     
  7. fishermanroly

    fishermanroly Out Of The Brooder

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    I personally have never had a problem with pecking or anything like that using plain old 60 watt. Then again i hatch out bobwhite quail and Coturnix quail maybe it's different with chickens.
     

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