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White Silkie roos need a new home - Vermont

Discussion in 'Animals In Need of Free Re-Homing' started by MilesFluffybutt, Aug 3, 2017.

  1. MilesFluffybutt

    MilesFluffybutt Songster

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    I am overrun with roosters, and regrettably, do not have enough time to keep a rooster flock. So I'm looking to rehome a few Silkie roos. They're great birds with gentle dispositions and great personalities. I will not send them home to someone who's going to put them in the pot or send'em to Freezer Camp. If that's your intention, please don't apply.
     
  2. Sara Ranch

    Sara Ranch Songster

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    Jun 7, 2017
    Hi!

    Two things...maybe three...

    1. If you have raised these guys, they probably get along. They would probably easily move into a rooster flock. I have several rooster flocks (all adoptees) and they don't usually take up any more time than a regular flock. You just need a fence between the roosters and the girls. And a separate place for them to sleep. I converted a barn into the Roo Barn. :D

    2. If you have any questions about a rooster flock, please feel free to email me here. I will be happy to share my experiences and offer guidance. Mine were a bit more challenging because the roosters were all adopted and they had to adjust to a new home.

    3. If this isn't for you, or your try it and decide no thank you, my ranch in WV is available for a forever home for the guys. I can't drive to VT but maybe we could meet somewhere. I am blessed that sometimes I can adopt hens, and after they are vetted, sometimes my boys get girlfriends! :love

    Either way, I hope this has a really happy ending for you and the boys!
     
    MilesFluffybutt likes this.
  3. MilesFluffybutt

    MilesFluffybutt Songster

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    Nov 16, 2016
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    Hi Sara,

    Thank you for your thoughtful reply. I have given serious thought to starting a rooster flock. Since I have been unable to rehome my boys, I guess I'll figure out how to work another coop into my tiny/cramped 1.5 acre lot. I have two coops already.

    I literally have 11 boys (10 cockerels and 1 rooster) and 7 pullets. They have been raised in different groups.

    The rooster was a loner until this Spring when I brought home 6 Silkie chicks (4 boys, 2 girls). To help booster the girl-boy ration, I bought 8 Faverolles from Cackle Hatchery. They were supposed to be all girls, but I got four of each. They are currently in the brooder, which they are outgrowing fast. They'll have to go into the big coop soon - gotta partition it off so everyone can get to know one another.

    Then I adopted 3 more Silkies (2 boys, 1 girl). They were supposed to be girls, and when I got there I knew two of them were boys. They had such sweet personalities, I couldn't leave them. Nor could I take just the hen - she was so protective of her boys, one of which is crippled (deformed feet/crooked toe). I didn't want to break them up.

    There's a bit of fighting - mostly chasing, feather pulling and resource guarding. Not sure why they're resource guarding, they have several feeders, waterers and treat stashes, plus they free range all day.

    The crippled one keeps getting picked on so I may have to move that group into the a-frame coop. Which means the d-bag that's in there has to come out and go somewhere. Not sure where yet. We'll see how he does when I re-integrate him with the flock. The flock has been peaceful without him.

    *head desk*
     
  4. Sara Ranch

    Sara Ranch Songster

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    Jun 7, 2017
    hhmmm...don't think traditional coop. :) I took a "storage building" that was repurposed to be a "barn" and repurposed it to be a Roo Barn. Inside the barn, I just built small rooms (wood and hardware cloth), put sand on the concrete floor, and a 2x4 for a roost. The guys go into their "rooms" for the night. They come out for the day.

    Pretty much any protected space will work for the boys. Because I have adopted the boys, I usually keep the siblings in the same room. Twice, I have had to pull out the lowest guy on the pecking order due to extreme unacceptable behavior by the top tier, and given those boys their own room. Sometimes it's just the stress of being re-homed that causes the bad behavior. After a month or so, I try to reintegrate them into the same sleeping room. Usually works. And sometimes the boys will change room-mates themselves. It all works out. :)

    They all free range together, with my ducks. If any are exhibiting unacceptable behavior (such as ganging up on someone) then they are put into an open air run for the day. Most of the time, they correct their behavior and join the group again. Lol - I do have a few guys that will decide when time out is over with. They can fly over the low fence in the open air run. And when they decide time out is over with, they very QUIETLY leave the run and very QUIETLY start free ranging again. They do their best to stay off my radar. :)

    You don't need any fancy housing for the guys. Just make sure they have enough room on the roosting bar (recommend 2x4) for everyone.

    I do my roosting bar one level and ONLY one bar. Period. I don't encourage a pecking order. In one room, I have 9 guys together. They all fit on the roosting bar. In another room, I have 3 BIG boys together. If you can't fit all of your boys on one roosting bar (due to space) then make two, but have them the same height.

    Again, if you have any questions, please email me. I would be happy to share experiences and answer questions.
     

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