" who choose's between the cock/female"

Discussion in 'Guinea Fowl' started by ludwing, Nov 20, 2014.

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  1. ludwing

    ludwing Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi everyone in this beautiful world....i've heard something that seem's ordinary to me, we have three guineafowls one male;2hens..the question is who choose's to mate with another like ( does the hen hang herself down for a male to take over...or does a cock chases a hen like in chickens? )
     
  2. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Normally, there's some degree of over-excited or pushy behavior in the average young male because often the females are not interested at the age he becomes interested in mating, but until they're ready, they will not cooperate even if he chases them around. When they reach maturity they will cooperate and issue invitations to mate when they are at their most fertile, and gradually he will learn what times are best. It's much the same with chooks.

    Roosters chasing hens indicates social dysfunction, not a natural trait for the species; normally, if she has sufficient instincts, the hen indicates when she's fertile and invites the male to mate, and will reject him other times, and if he's got enough instincts he will understand what times are best to pass on his genes, so respects rejection since it indicates a futile time to mate.

    Chasing is an aberrant, but still common enough behavior, like most social malfunctions. It's due to human husbandry methods, not natural to the species.

    You get varying degrees of instinct, with less instinctive/intelligent animals trying to force matings all over the place, even with dying or underage or infertile or same-sex individuals (or even other species, inanimate objects and corpses), and the more instinctive/intelligent ones choosing mates very carefully and biding their time during low fertility periods.

    Guineas are generally less interfered with than most other domestic poultry, and often their instincts will be more intact for that reason, and you'll find some will form pair bonds or trios, and the matings will be organized, efficient and cooperative, rather than the complaining, hysterical, stressful mess some chickens think is normal mating, lol.

    Best wishes.
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2014
  3. ludwing

    ludwing Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That's a best information iv'e ever read thanks alot ( chooks4life) iv'e appreciate it more than alot..

    We have 3 guineas, 1 male and 2 hens ( 1 hen died ) that i think they are almost 11 months old this year...the male guinea especially in the morning/afternoos like chasing roosters with humpback display,making food offerings for hens to eat even to their mother ( chicken )
    we are almost reaching early summer now and our guineas are still not stable ( like in normal guineas that pair up in spring )
    will they still breed this year? Are they still young ( 11 months ) to mate? Or is the any problem with the weathering? Ive heard that guineas breeding season coincide with the summer rainfalls
    we have recieved more that 300 mm rainfall this spring and the temp is mediocre

    any infor will be appreciated alot to calm my stresfulnes....
     
  4. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    You're welcome. :)

    Sounds to me like your male is ready to breed, and if the females are responding to him at all, I'd say they're pretty likely to be ready to breed this year. 36 weeks old and over is what I've read as being the average breeding age of females.

    It does depend on your seasons, as you say; your profile doesn't say where you live but if you add this info it will be easier for people to answer your questions because so much info is very regionally specific, whether talking about diseases or treatments or parasites or weather or predators or laws or whatever else.

    Males of species that make long term or permanent pair bonds don't need to chase the females, they have behaviors to attract them like finding food, and this sort of behavior tends to confirm to the females that he has the sufficient instincts to be a good mate/father, and when the time comes to breed, they will favor males like this to breed with. Generally birds that make permanent family bonds won't mate with males that don't know to provide food, since it shows he is lacking in instincts necessary for survival of the offspring. Your male is already doing his part, it should bring the females around to bonding with him. Sometimes you get a male who only chases them around and they avoid him like the plague until he learns to attract them, I've seen this happen a few times, lol. Having a mature male around will also bring females of many species into reproductive condition sooner.

    This site has many links on all sorts of topics about guinea fowl, it'll possibly answer even questions you don't yet know you need the answer to. ;)
    Quote: Best wishes.
     
  5. ludwing

    ludwing Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you again ( chook ). I now have the knowledge of young breeding guineas...

    I'll now have to watch what will happen after all this chasing,food offering and display...i will post again when they start showing some signs of laying...

    Thanks again ( chook4life ) for the site and your time...i've learned alot from your

    your wishes
     
  6. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    You're welcome, hope things go well for you and your guineas.

    Best wishes.
     
  7. ColesCreek

    ColesCreek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ludwing, Young males will chase the females to try and breed with them so they don't get caught by the mature boys and get pecked up. . It works quite alot too as all the experienced breeders see every year when they breed thousands of keets as this normal behavior happens and many from 5-6 month old males as fathers.

    Happy breeding Ludwing
     
  8. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    He only has one male, so any chasing behavior is not due to having alpha males around trying to prevent breeding. ;)

    In my experience it's due to social imbalance and humans interfering with the natural social structure, and over the generations altering the social traits of the domestic percentage of the species.

    Best wishes.
     
  9. ludwing

    ludwing Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well guys im still on the float..

    One of the female went missing for two days ( dont ask me where she was ) she then return on the third day...
    I have noticed something about her that she always went missing during their breakfast and im afraid that of losing her from starvation.
    I know she's not broody but i have a strong desire of her. Beacaus she only comes back during sunset.
    I want them to free-range as much as they please. Because i know we have no predators but hunting for nests site is'nt what i want.....

    Well im just still a little bit lost in the floating leaves of autumn wind
     
  10. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Sounds to me like she's making a nest somewhere. ;)

    Probably already laid a few. I'd bet they're fertile and she's the alpha hen, that's usually how it goes. Chances are she's also your best hen and will produce the best offspring.

    If she were so ravenous she'd be scoffing breakfast, but she's turning her nose up at it. When laying their clutch they don't brood at all, that starts once the last egg is laid.

    Try following her perhaps; at a distance so it's not obvious, don't look directly at her too much or face her with your body too much, either, is a good precaution... I've had hens lead me on the scenic route, with endless detours and circlings-back and deceptive behaviors to try to stop me tracking them back to a nest. Even low instinct and low intelligence hens can exhibit some remarkably clever antics when it comes to throwing you off the trail to their secret nest.

    Most guinea hens are killed brooding or on the nest, from what I hear and read, since they make isolated 'hidden' nests which the predators can nonetheless smell, and remain on them, making them easy targets.

    Best wishes.
     
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