Who Has A Green Thumb?

Discussion in 'Gardening' started by chickensrock12, Dec 6, 2016.

  1. chickensrock12

    chickensrock12 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So, last spring I planted a garden. But, it didn't go so well. It's pretty funny for the last 6 years I've planted food there. I always plant the same stuff, except every other year I plant pumpkins. I plant tomato's, watermelon, peppers, eggplant, corn, and carrots. So, what happened this year. I do the same thing every year. Please help me, so this doesn't happen next year. Thank you and give me your feedback.
     
  2. ejcrist

    ejcrist Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Desert Hills, AZ
    It's difficult to say without details. Are you rotating your crops? Tomatoes, eggplant, and peppers are all niteshade family so if you plant any one in a row the other grew in the season prior it has the same effect as not rotating your crops - depleted soil and increased risk of disease. Corn and Melons are heavy feeders so they should be followed by a crop with different requirements in a different family. Also, you can't rely on synthetic fertilizers alone since they lack the micronutrients. What's the soil structure like? Are you adding organic matter every year? What's the pH? I'm guessing if you're in New York your soil is around 5.5-6.0. There could be a gazillian things to consider but first I'd make sure you're rotating crops at a minimum of a three year rotation.
     
  3. chickensrock12

    chickensrock12 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 22, 2015
    Utah
    Ok, thank you. I think I didn't rotate my crops this year. Must be the soil, I didn't put as much compost as I did the last 6 years. My compost was running out. Is that the problem?
     
  4. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    CENTRAL MAINE
    Start with a soil test. A basic test at your county ag. extension should cost about $15. Are you amending the soil every year with compost, leaves, grass clippings, other organic matter? At the end of the growing season, what to you do with the garden debris? In a perfect world, it might be put into a hot compost pile so any disease and insect organisms will be destroyed, and the nutrient can be returned to the soil before planting. (My world is not perfect. I either use garden debris as mulch, unless it's weedy. Then it gets moved into the chicken run and they turn it into wonderful, black, nutrient laden, compost that can then be moved to the garden.) IMO, bare soil is depleted soil. I am a fan of Back to Eden and Ruth Stout. Research both of these methods, and get a soil test done.
     
  5. chickensrock12

    chickensrock12 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 22, 2015
    Utah
    OK, must it be because I moved the compost under the trees this year. I had to make room for a new shed I was getting. Before I moved it, it was in the sun under a tarp. I did a test when I started about 6 years ago. When they returned it to me. They said it was fine and I can plant for years and years before something goes wrong. They also gave me a guide on how to plant seeds, how to grow it right, and much more. I have read it three times. It must be where I put the compost pile right.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2016

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