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Who Has The Dominate Dna?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by newchickens2009, Dec 13, 2009.

  1. newchickens2009

    newchickens2009 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    BAHAMAS
    THE HEN OR THE ROOSTER? IF I PUT A R.I.RED ROOSTER ON A WHITE LEGHORN HEN, DO I GET WHITE EGGS OR BROWN? A ROCK OR ORPINGTON ROO ON A EE HEN DO I GET BLUE/GREEN OR BROWN EGGS?[​IMG]
     
  2. chickenwhisperer123

    chickenwhisperer123 Whispers Loudly

    Mar 7, 2009
    Lincoln, Nebraska
    I believe that each parent contributes one gene for the egg color.
     
  3. Mahonri

    Mahonri Urban Desert Chicken Enthusiast Premium Member

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    My Coop
    RIR X White Leghorn; brown egg

    Rock or Orpington X EE hen: depends either brown/ olive or green.
     
  4. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Quote:One copy of EACH gene relating to egg colour. There are many.
     
  5. chickenwhisperer123

    chickenwhisperer123 Whispers Loudly

    Mar 7, 2009
    Lincoln, Nebraska
    Quote:One copy of EACH gene relating to egg colour. There are many.

    Well, I tried. lol I think I may be starting to get a *small* grasp on genetics!! [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2009
  6. newchickens2009

    newchickens2009 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank You All For The Reply. I Guess I Will Just Have To See What I Get?
     
  7. BarkerChickens

    BarkerChickens Microbrewing Chickenologist

    Nov 25, 2007
    High Desert, CA
    Quote:One gene from each parent is passed on to the offspring. The RIR will pass on a brown egg gene and the White Leghorn will pass on a white egg gene. The offspring will have one of each, but the brown egg gene is dominant over the white, therefore, the offspring will be brown egg layers. As for the Orp/EE, it depends. EEs aren't purebred, so you will either get a brown or green egg layer.
     
  8. SteveH

    SteveH Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 10, 2009
    West/Central IL
    I know just enough about genetics to get myself in trouble , but here goes :

    Each parent has two genes for egg color , and contributes one to each offspring . Blue is dominent over white , therefore if the chicken inherents a gene for blue eggs it lays blue eggs . Pure [ homozygous ] for blue eggs can be written as BB and when crossed on a chicken pure for white eggs which we will call ww you will get all Bw and they will all lay blue eggs . These chickens are not pure for blue eggs and that's called heterozygous . Bw crossed on ww will result in offspring of which 50% will be Bw and lay blue eggs , 50% will be ww and lay white eggs . Brown or green eggs are actually white or blue eggs with a stain applied to the outer surface changing its outer appearence ; if you peel the membrane off the insige of the egg you will find its either white or blue . Once you've crossed either a white egg layer or a blue egg layer with a chicken capable of producing brown tint on its eggs that brown tint ability is usually passed on to one degree or another . Most crosses of white egg layers to brown tinted egg layers are going to lay brown tinted eggs , and most blue to brown tinted will lay green .
     
  9. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Brown is not dominant to white; they are not the same genes. There are a dozen or more genes relating to egg colour. White and brown are actually different things. White is the eggshell itself (white is recessive to a blue eggshell). Brown is a coating that is (or is not) "painted" onto the formed shell. If any brown egg genes are passed on from either parent, a brown coating will be applied to the egg. If the not-brown alternatives are present, this coating will not be applied.
     
  10. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    SteveH we were replying at the same time. While I would take issue for the specific letters you've used to describe blue versus white eggshell, your concept is close to accurate. The actual letters used are O for blue and o for white--O stands for oocyanin, which I may not have spelled correctly, but it should be close [​IMG]

    O, blue, is the dominant allele and o, not-blue (white) is the recessive allele. Each chicken has two of these: O/O, O/o+ or o+/o+. The first two will produce a blue eggshell; the latter a white eggshell. Then there are a number of genes that can add coatings or tints to the outer surface of the eggshell.
     

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