Whole flock has Favus

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by my3jsons, Jan 4, 2011.

  1. my3jsons

    my3jsons Chillin' With My Peeps

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    After much research on the internet about Favus (avian ringworm), we have decided that our whole flock has it. At first we thought it was just the rooster but after inspecting all the hens we found white and black spots on all their combs and wattles. I called 3 farm vets in our area who couldn't help me. But I was referred to the State Dept. of Agriculture. A very nice vet working for the state had me email photos, who then sent them to a poultry vet in Texas. He thought it was Favus and said to continue treating with micronazole (Monistat 7) topically. He said it could take weeks or even a month. This could prove costly (I've used one tube in 2 days) so if you ever have to deal with this ask your pharmacist. Mine is ordering in larger amounts at 1/3 the price. Now we just have to catch them everyday.

    I still have some questions that he will hopefully answer for me:
    Are the eggs safe?
    Will the rooster reinfect the hens since his case is much worse and will take longer to heal (I assume)?

    I found very few pictures of favus on the internet, so I thought I would share mine for anyone who might find them helpful someday.

    This is the first picture I have of it. After this the comb continued to turn white like powder and then scabbed over black and scaly.
    [​IMG]

    this is what it looks like now. Black and scaly but edges of white underneath. Some areas are bloody occasionally. And the front edges of the wattles look like they are eaten away. Yuck!
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    All of the hens have tiny specks of white and some black on their combs. These aren't as clear (sorry!)
    [​IMG]

    This hen has lost some feathers around her eyes, comb, and wattles.
    [​IMG]

    There are also areas on their backs above their tails that look scaly, wrinkly, and have brown, divit like spots. The vet couldn't determine if these were favus cups or not. They might be from the rooster being to rough (although we have never seen that), hen picking hen, molting, or a combination of all three. I thought I would still include them anyway.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I'm so discouraged that I didn't find out what this was until now and that it involves my whole flock especially since this is the first time I have had chickens. I hope they will all recover. And I hope that you don't ever have to deal with this.
     
  2. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    You know...it almost looks like mites are eating away at them. Did you see if they're mites? If it is favus, miconazole comes in fungal spray cans, like for athletics foot...Lotrimin or Tinactin. You'd have to check the back of the label on the cans.
     
  3. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

    Sometimes it can feel overwhelming when your flock needs to be treated with meds (I have felt that way). But when it's over...you can go back to the enjoyment again.

    I hope your flock gets better soon. [​IMG]
     
  4. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    BOCOMO
    my3jsons wrote: Are the eggs safe?
    Will the rooster reinfect the hens since his case is much worse and will take longer to heal (I assume)?

    Eggs are safe. Beaks can transfer the fungus (so just massage antifungal cream onto all the combs after they go to roost). To suppress picking the antifungal cream can be mixed with a bit of pine tar (wear gloves). Pine tar can be scraped into a plastic cup and nuked in the microwave for a few seconds at a time (until it is softened up) and the cream squirted into the cup and mixed thoroughly. The PT tastes terrible and is an excellent antibiotic (old `skool' poultry tool).

    The roo's wattles have the look of being frostbitten (got `em in the waterer, possibly), his comb might have taken a hit (along with the fungus) as well. With daily treatment the fungal infection should clear up nicely. Is the coop well ventilated? Sometimes, in cold, damp weather, high humidity can contribute to fungal growth.

    If you can post some up close shots of the `flank' involvement, I'm sure someone will be able to ID.

    Here is another fungus thread: https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=310669&p=1

    Good
    luck!​
     
  5. my3jsons

    my3jsons Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 15, 2010
    Oklahoma
    The rooster is improving little by little. He does have a very red and irritated bottom. Would this be the favus or mites or both?
    I have decided to start treating for mites also. Will the sevin spray work just as well as the powder? That is all we could find at Home Depot.
    I'm assuming the eggs will not be safe to eat now.
    Thanks!
     
  6. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    BOCOMO
    Post up a clear shot of area of `irritation' of rooster's `bottom'. Thought it is hard to see much from the pics of `scabs', 'cups', `abrasions' - or could be pecking at sites where feathers are erupting??? Have you actually eyeballed `mites'? Have you felt them crawling on you after you've handled chooks? Any increase in feather loss (discolored shafts/chawed up barbs - feather mites)? Northern Fowl Mites do prefer roo's owing the feathers instead of fluff in `butt' area (both FM's/NFM's can be seen/IDed with x10 jewelry loupe).

    Sevin spray should be fine (here is a circular from Carbaryl product - gives an idea how it is used on poultry -page 8/9): http://www.afpmb.org/pubs/standardlists/labels/6840-00-932-7297_label_carbaryl.pdf
    Withdrawl
    chart for approved meds with withdrawl times (7 days on Sevin): http://www.cfo.on.ca/_pdfs/PoultryWithdrawalTimeChart-Mar30-07.pdf

    Check
    flock when they're preening before they go to roost (just watch behavior). They'll often not only preen their own feathers but will pick around on other chooks standing close (often around tails and rear portion of flanks). Put down some white paper and hold chooks over it while running hands under wings and over butts. Use loupe to look through whatever falls out on paper. If you find mites/mite parts/shed exoskeletons then treat with spray (also completely strip and clean coop(s)). Backyard flocks usually get mites from wild bird populations. I wouldn't bother treating until I knew for sure.

    Good luck!
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2011
  7. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=351871
    see
    post #6

    I'd hold out for the sevin dust (which I have seen at my Home Depot). You can also buy poultry dust (permethrin) at the feed stores. Mites in certain parts of the country can be resistant to permethrin AND sevin is what I have read- but you can use either product and will probably kill them.

    You need to retreat in 10 days. Put it in an old sock or stocking and dust under the wings, and everywhere except the face.

    I wouldn't use the liquid sevin for anything but spraying coops. (And I wouldn't buy it at ALL.)

    You can order via internet if you cannot find it locally:

    http://www.jefferslivestock.com/prozap-poultry-garden-dust/camid/LIV/cp/LE-S1/cn/3504/
    I have ordered from them (and have used the product but bought it at feed store) successfully.

    http://www.mcmurrayhatchery.com/insectrin_dust.html
    I have ordered from them successfully.
     
  8. my3jsons

    my3jsons Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you ivan3 and chickensaresweet. I appreciate your advice.

    I've never seen a withdrawal chart that is so comprehensive. This is wonderful, thanks!
     
  9. AlGalMom

    AlGalMom Out Of The Brooder

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    My birds' combs look just like your rooster's in the top picture. How did you treat it? Were you able to get rid of the infection? Thanks!
     
  10. Gonda

    Gonda Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a few birds with white, scaly looking faces. One is quite bad, with crusting in the neck feathers. I see no other evidence on the rest of the body that would point to lice or mites. Is this favus?

    [​IMG] This bird (first picture) also has a limp. I'm wondering if it's Mareks disease, except she is not just limping, she has her foot curled up and is favouring it.

    This hen is raising a chick, and I noticed her comb was looking quite bad, so I gave her a deworming treatment. But now, looking more closely, I see she also has the white scabby looking face. [​IMG]


    And I've been watching the big Roo's comb, which looks a little less healthy and has some white spots in it. [​IMG]

    I've checked repeatedly for lice and mites and see no evidence on the birds. They have healthy looking skin, no sign of irritation near the vents.

    I also have a young roo with a dry, crusty raised area underneath it's wattles. [​IMG]

    Is this all pointing to the same problem? Might it all be favus?

    Any thoughts?
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2011

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