Whole Town Infected with some tree dwelling bug any Idea?

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by MMPoultryFarms, Sep 20, 2010.

  1. MMPoultryFarms

    MMPoultryFarms Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 21, 2010
    Okarche Oklahoma
    Our whole intire community has been taken over by some kind of bug that chews a perfect circle around the branches of trees and when the wind blows they fall. Today one of my chickens got hit in the head with a branch from this (?????) Should I lock the girls up for a day or 2 and have the crop duster dust my pecan trees. or is there some other kind of resolve for this (?????) I never would have even thought of worrying about it or even bothering with it as I love to take the pecan branches they drop and use em for wood to smoke with and cook with. But after seeing my dark cornish almost get knocked out. (he just fell over and flopped a few times like they do when they dust then took of running squacking) anyone at least know what this thing is? or should I post a pic of the branches?
     
  2. Gallo del Cielo

    Gallo del Cielo La Gallina Resort & Spa

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    May 6, 2010
    Tucson
    My Coop
    Post a pic of the bug if you can. [​IMG]
     
  3. MMPoultryFarms

    MMPoultryFarms Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 21, 2010
    Okarche Oklahoma
    Quote:LOL can you come hold my ladder while i climb way upthere and try to catch it?
     
  4. mikeksfarmer

    mikeksfarmer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Bonner springs KS
    Its a leaf gerdler (Sp?) but it lays its egg in the leaves then partialy chews the twig so wind will break it and the eggs are down in time to hatch and crawl into the ground safe.
    Most years they do little damage.
     
  5. carrlr

    carrlr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 31, 2010
    Southern Illinois
    So, in this case the sky is falling!! [​IMG] Glad to hear your cornish is OK. Not sure there is much you can do besides keeping your chickens from the "drop zone". I would imagine this would only occur for a short period of time.
     
  6. MMPoultryFarms

    MMPoultryFarms Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 21, 2010
    Okarche Oklahoma
    Quote:I have no idea what these things look like theres no bugs on the limbs and I am not in the physical condition to climb the tree to find out as I had shoulder operation. but its been like that 2 years now. the part where the limb is cut is pperfectly rounded. I will post a pic sometime today.
     
  7. carrlr

    carrlr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 31, 2010
    Southern Illinois
    Quote:I have no idea what these things look like theres no bugs on the limbs and I am not in the physical condition to climb the tree to find out as I had shoulder operation. but its been like that 2 years now. the part where the limb is cut is pperfectly rounded. I will post a pic sometime today.

    How large was this "branch" that hit your chicken?

    Maybe this info will help:


    There are two insects that cut off twigs of hardwoods: the twig girdler and the twig pruner. Both of these insects belong to a group of beetles known as the long-horned wood borers.



    The adult twig girdler cuts twigs off trees in late summer and fall. Eggs are laid in the section of the twigs that are cut off. These eggs hatch into whitish-colored, legless larvae. The larvae grow slowly during the winter and spring months as they feed and tunnel within the twig, then grow rapidly through the summer emerging as adults in August and September. The larvae usually take about one year to develop into an adult.


    Adult twig pruners deposit eggs in slits in the bark near the tips of twigs and small branches in the spring. Upon hatching, the larvae begin feeding under the bark. As they grow and develop, the larvae feed down the center of the stem toward its base. In late summer, they sever the twig by making a spiral cut from the center of the twig outward to, but not through the bark. This thin layer of bark cannot hold the twig onto the branch and eventually the twig breaks off and falls to the ground with the larva still inside. The larva pupates within the twig and emerges as an adult the following spring or fall. It takes about a year for the twig girdler to develop from an egg into an adult.


    About the only way to control the twig girdler and twig pruner is to collect the severed twigs containing the larvae and destroy them by burning, shredding, or removing the twigs from the area. Control of these insects with insecticides is not practical.


    To determine if the twig was cut by the twig girdler or the twig pruner, examine the end where the cut was made. If the end of the twig looks like it was chewed from the outside in, and has an appearance much like the end of a tree that was cut down by a beaver, then the cut was made by the twig girdler. If the end of the twig looks like it was cut with a saw and there appears to be a spiral patterned cut radiating from the center of the twig outward, then the cut was made by the twig pruner.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2010
  8. MMPoultryFarms

    MMPoultryFarms Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 21, 2010
    Okarche Oklahoma
    Quote:I have no idea what these things look like theres no bugs on the limbs and I am not in the physical condition to climb the tree to find out as I had shoulder operation. but its been like that 2 years now. the part where the limb is cut is pperfectly rounded. I will post a pic sometime today.

    How large was this "branch" that hit your chicken?

    Maybe this info will help:


    There are two insects that cut off twigs of hardwoods: the twig girdler and the twig pruner. Both of these insects belong to a group of beetles known as the long-horned wood borers.



    The adult twig girdler cuts twigs off trees in late summer and fall. Eggs are laid in the section of the twigs that are cut off. These eggs hatch into whitish-colored, legless larvae. The larvae grow slowly during the winter and spring months as they feed and tunnel within the twig, then grow rapidly through the summer emerging as adults in August and September. The larvae usually take about one year to develop into an adult.


    Adult twig pruners deposit eggs in slits in the bark near the tips of twigs and small branches in the spring. Upon hatching, the larvae begin feeding under the bark. As they grow and develop, the larvae feed down the center of the stem toward its base. In late summer, they sever the twig by making a spiral cut from the center of the twig outward to, but not through the bark. This thin layer of bark cannot hold the twig onto the branch and eventually the twig breaks off and falls to the ground with the larva still inside. The larva pupates within the twig and emerges as an adult the following spring or fall. It takes about a year for the twig girdler to develop from an egg into an adult.


    About the only way to control the twig girdler and twig pruner is to collect the severed twigs containing the larvae and destroy them by burning, shredding, or removing the twigs from the area. Control of these insects with insecticides is not practical.


    To determine if the twig was cut by the twig girdler or the twig pruner, examine the end where the cut was made. If the end of the twig looks like it was chewed from the outside in, and has an appearance much like the end of a tree that was cut down by a beaver, then the cut was made by the twig girdler. If the end of the twig looks like it was cut with a saw and there appears to be a spiral patterned cut radiating from the center of the twig outward, then the cut was made by the twig pruner.

    thank you alot this one is it right here."" If the end of the twig looks like it was cut with a saw and there appears to be a spiral patterned cut radiating from the center of the twig outward, then the cut was made by the twig pruner."" btw the so called twig was 1 1/2 inch aprox as big as 2 fingers.
     

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