Whopper of a young Coturnix

Discussion in 'Quail' started by laseterlass, Feb 6, 2013.

  1. laseterlass

    laseterlass Chillin' With My Peeps

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    She is 23 days old. [​IMG] She also has interesting feathers [​IMG] A ? Should I turn the light off at night. I removed heat at 14 days. Or light on so she eats 24 hours aday.
     
  2. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend... Staff Member

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    The heat/light is not so they will eat during the night. It is only for keeping them warm. Young quail's bodies are not able to adjust their internal temps, warm or cold, until they are fully mature. It takes time. I personally would not remove the heat yet, even during the day.

    If you want to remove the night time heat, then do it slowly so you give them time to learn to adjust. You say you have already removed the day time heat. As long as you are sure they are not cold, then you can use a heat lamp at night, but adjust the temp so it does not fall more than 5 to 10 degrees lower than the room temp. Keep an eye on them for chilling. Next week do the same from the new temp until they can tolerate bigger swings in temps.
     
  3. laseterlass

    laseterlass Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I guess I was not clear. I remove heat earlier than most people as it encourages feather growth. It is no cooler than 70 degrees ever in the brooder. I am wondering if she will grow bigger under 24 hour light as she will eat more. She was ahead of the curve set by Moby Quails study. But since I began turning off the light at night she has fallen behind.
     
  4. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend... Staff Member

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    Being chilled will slow the growth down. If they need calories to stay warm instead of put it toward growth, they will grow slower.
     
  5. laseterlass

    laseterlass Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes that makes sense. But they lay around panting. I think I will just leave a dim light on at night. Out of 25 cots she is the only Giant one. She is also the only egg over 15 grams that hatched. I have been throwing every 14 plus egg in the bator.
     
  6. bingrancher

    bingrancher Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Just watch her legs and feet as she grows. I talk to moby and some other guys and robbie at james marie farms told me if they gain weight faster then the bones grow they end up culling. I think robbie had a above normal cot hen once but she was too heavy for her own feet and he culled her. But if your hens legs are good then go for it. I like to turn off lights because those hens are chased constantly and if its dark my birds usually stop chasing each other and get some rest.
     
  7. laseterlass

    laseterlass Chillin' With My Peeps

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    She is out of some of Robbie's birds. Another lady in AK has a 16 ounce tibean tuxedo.
     
  8. animalsrock123

    animalsrock123 Out Of The Brooder

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    Wow she is pretty! I have some 26 day old chicks and if the temp reaches 72 degrees Fahrenheit they start to shiver. So just to be safe I would keep the light on her, and slowly get her adjusted to colder temps.
     
  9. laseterlass

    laseterlass Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG]
    She is back to gaining she was 170 grams yesterday morning and 182 this morning! Its not like she sits with her beak in the feeder either. She is jumping arouns just like the rest of the group. 25 days old this morning.
     
  10. animalsrock123

    animalsrock123 Out Of The Brooder

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    is she an Italian? She looks like one...
     

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